Do You Let Change Rumours Breakdown Trust?

Change is emotional. Often, those impacted, or potentially impacted, ‘find out’ through the rumour mill. This inevitably leads to a lack of understanding about what a specific change may mean, and as a result can cause mangers to break expectations and perceived promises. Psychologists talk about this being a breach of the ‘psychological contract’. The ‘psychological contract’ exists as explicit and implicit understandings between employer and employee, or manager and direct reports, and also at a company level.

The ‘Psychological Contract’ is not obvious . It is important. Like an iceberg, most of it is hidden.

Change has the potential to breach psychological contracts and breakdown trust. Sometimes such a breach never heals. Therefore, its best to avoid breaches in the first place and this requires good communication to help people establish ‘what is in it for me’.

Change may have the potential to impact thousands of people at the same time. This can intensify emotions and unless communication is established it can also lead to industrial action. Therefore, organisations need to be aware of how they impact psychological contract at the overall company level and also what the leaders and supervisors are doing during times of change.

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499

E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people.

Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Special projects, secondments and assignments
  • Mediation, to address workplace conflict
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations

 

It’s not rocket science is it? – 5 test questions, just in case it is

Rockets put satellites into orbit, does that make them more complex to understand than human behaviour?

Rockets put satellites into orbit, does that make them more complex to understand than human behaviour?

“It’s not rocket science is it?”

How often do we hear that? This powerful, loaded question is often posed when people start to rationalise proposals for new ways of working. Then an unspoken:

“so we are doing it already, stupid”

hangs in the air.
However, usually when I hear this it indicates to me that the person I am talking to knows that change is not easy. This person knows that moving from the idea of change to starting new behaviours is really challenging. In their heart of hearts they know something different needs to happen. They don’t have the ‘know-how’ to bring this about. Perhaps also they may not want to face the energy demand associated with facing up to a change.

I encourage the person to keep talking to me at this stage as this is the very moment to continue a dialogue.

The knack is to call out this underlying point:

Hold conversations

Hold conversations with people to understand what is holding them back from taking on board new expectations about behaviours

“It may not be rocket science; however, people are not really making any change after all, and it’s not clear what is holding people back from not doing the behaviours?”

 

 

 

 

Here are 5 follow up questions that I find useful for testing whether rocket science just might be more involved than first thought:

1. What evidence do they have to indicate that the behaviours required may or may not be in place?

2. When people are under pressure is there evidence that shows the behaviours consistently remain in place?

3. Are the words associated with a change unfamiliar to people? If so, what may be the benefit of using words that are more familiar?

4. What are the tangible gains that people can point to from changing behaviours?

5. How will you know the change has been successful – what will success look like?

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499

E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people.

 

Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Special projects, secondments and assignments
  • Mediation, to address workplace conflict
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations

Marjorie Raymond

How do you engage your people during organisational change?

New approaches to mentoring means it is not old hat

Mentoring is certainly not old hat

I’m asked quite often whether mentoring really works as a way to engage people during organisational change.

My answer goes something like this:

  • Research shows that organizations who establish a mentoring programme will see a significant effect on levels of employee engagement.
  • However, employee engagement during times of change is important. It builds understanding. It builds commitment. As a result, people see their organization positively and they will ‘go the extra mile ‘.
  • The old hat model of ‘mentoring for high-flyers’ is overturned by being most effective with the bottom 20% of performers.
  • Mentoring delivers higher levels of engagement and is valuable.

These days mentoring is a much broader approach.  Rather refreshingly it now applies to everyone.

Mentoring is for everyone

Mentoring is for everyone, it builds skill and confidence

Mentoring is especially useful in virtual teams, project teams and during organisational change. Nowadays mentoring is about learning and advising. When carried out in this way it raises levels of knowledge and skill, builds competencies and develops confidence.

If you need to introduce a change to how people work, then consider using mentoring to help people engage in the change and sustain it in future.

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499

E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people.

Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Special projects, secondments and assignments
  • Mediation, to address workplace conflict
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations

‘Straight Talking’ Make change easy

Create change through conversations

Create change through conversations

Straight Talking

Making change easy

Too often moaning and groaning is the only communication people expect – and get!

What a shame when those first meetings present the best opportunity to introduce change positively. And if this opportunity is missed it can even imperil the change programme.

This is the time to listen, and to understand, what is being said – and not being said.

This is the time to use dialogue, to help people think through the possibilities, and to help them create the necessary workable solutions.

You know this is happening when people say:

“We are ready to go. We don’t need to talk any more. We’ve sorted out what needs to happen for us to work well; we know how to make this work for us. Now we just want it to get on with it.”

 MWR Consulting’s ‘Straight Talking’ approach helps to create just such a ‘right’ environment for change. We are forward- focused – which leads to action.

We use workshops to help develop dialogue skills, so you can properly address the challenges you face. Our workshops allow you to challenge yourselves – and your organisation too – as to how ‘Straight Talking’ you really are.

Call us to today on 07779 345 499

For more information about ‘Straight Talking’ click here: Straight Talking create change through conversations

Build Stakeholder Relationships

Stakeholder's need you to help them create understanding about their change management  activities and resulting business value

Stakeholders need you to help them create understanding about their change management activities and resulting business value

It’s important to build stakeholder relationships quickly, as this gives everyone time to get to know one another.

Robert Stake (yes, great that his name mirrors his interest in stakeholders) has made it part of his life’s work to understand stakeholder relationships. He has developed an approach called “Responsive Evaluation”. It does what it says: the approach shows how to respond to stakeholder needs and wants, motivating them to engage with you.

I find the best way to explain this to stakeholders is to tell a story about the journey and the changes that will result. Do this in a way that makes it easy for the stakeholder to grasp. Good approaches include:

  • Create understanding. Link relationships about your change and planned business value
  • Enhance links using holistic information: be descriptive, say how. Also, provide process information
  • Acknowledge the personal and political aspects of decision-making
  • Shape data into information rather than just collect reams of data

You also need to scout out the organisation by asking good questions, such as: who is in a decision-making role? Why are your changes important to them? What values, biases or experiences may influence judgements about changes?

Also, find out what your stakeholders want to know? What questions do they have about your changes? How are they going to use the information they receive? What decisions may be coming up around your changes.

You need to help your stakeholders focus on the important questions their people have. Surveys, for example, give a good overview and also provide a baseline for plotting progress, with the aid of repeat survey activity.

Focus groups and interviews are also useful as they provide detail about emotional states. Best of all, they can reveal people’s “lived experience” stories.  Stakeholders can use these stories to act on expressed feelings.

However, activities need to be proportional to the change; one size does not fit all. But remind your stakeholders that people’s beliefs and values are more affected by metaphors, stories and anecdotes than they ever are by statistics.