Do you know what your values are and is your life guided by them?

CT aligns individual and team values with organisational goals

CT aligns individual and team values with organisational goals

When we are guided by values our life is easier.

Do you know what your values are and is your life guided by them?

Values are an important guide on your journey through life. They guide your direction, and your behaviour stems from them. When we are guided by values our life is easier. And when we are in conflict with them we feel upset, frustrated and perhaps even angry.

What are values?

Values are what you want to stand for deep in your heart*. Answering these questions will help you discover what yours are:

  • What do you want your life to be about?
  • What sort of things do you most want to do?
  • What type of person do you most want to be?
  • How do you want to be in your relationships with others?
  • What would you like to be remembered for by the people you love?

How do values work?

A value is like a lighthouse seen in the distance. It guides you through your journey in life, in good times as well as in challenging and difficult times.

Why are they important?

Values help you to pursue what matters to you; they aren’t goals. Rather, they are the personal choices you make about the direction of your life. (They are not about what you should, must or have to do.) Clarity about your values also gives you pointers to your goals and the actions that will help you move in your chosen direction. Values bring vitality and a sense of purpose to life.

Having clarity about your values means that you know where you are going and don’t have to keep checking you are on course. However, having clear values doesn’t ensure a straight path through life. Often you may need to change direction to get back to your values.

Values are usually stable, yet may change over time to reflect your achievements. Noticing your values change in this way represents small steps taken regarding the overall direction you have chosen. So, it’s important to stay in touch with your values, so as to support your ‘valued’ direction.

What values aren’t

Goals are way-markers along your chosen path. They can be achieved. You can tick them off and identify what you have achieved. Values, however, are behaviours we believe are important. So, you can’t achieve a value; rather you live using your values as a guide.

Individuals and teams who identify their values reap many benefits:

  • Individuals who understand their values gain insight into the behaviours that support them. This includes, for example, how they may vote, make consumer choices or choose an occupation.
  • Behaviours that are consistent with values help keep us going in our chosen direction. And behaving consistently builds trust.
  • Behaviours aligned to values develop individuals’ well-being

 Exercises to help people understand their values

  1. How to help individuals identify their values

Jump ahead to your 80th birthday party. All your friends and family, colleagues, and loved ones are there. It’s a good turn-out – imagine that all the people you have ever cared about are able to attend. Now the cake arrives. After you blow out your 80 candles everyone takes turns to talk about your personal qualities and key strengths.

Your task is this: what three things you would most want these people to say about the kind of person you have been in life? Choose whatever you want them to say about your personal qualities and key strengths. And remember: it’s your imaginary party, so please feel free to highlight what you would really want to hear people say about you on your Big Day.

  1. How to help a team identify and share their values

Before working with a team check that everyone agrees to share their top three values with each other. Start by using the exercise above, so everyone has a chance to identify their own values. Now, pair everyone up. Each partner then gets a turn at introducing the other partner – name and what job they do – and then tells everyone what the three things are that their partner would most want people to say at their 80th birthday party.

What do values look like when they have been identified?

The example below comes from an ACT coaching session with Eva. Eva is a project manager with a large UK insurance company. Her top three values are:

  • Being a loving and caring wife and mother
  • Being healthy, mentally and physically
  • Being a valued team member

* Adapted from: Harris, R (2008)The Happiness Trap (Based on ACT: A revolutionary mindfulness-based programme for overcoming stress, anxiety and depression), Robinson

Russ is very generous with materials. You can find some more here: http://www.actmindfully.com.au/

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499

E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people.

Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Certified ACT practioner
  • Support if you are being bullied, or have a member of your organisation who has made a bullying complaint
  • Certified Mediation practioner, to address workplace conflict,
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations
  • Special projects, secondments and assignments

 

How to think straight when bad things happen

When bad things happen we may have an emotional struggle

In difficult times our self talk can be harsh – like a radio turned up high – it drowns out everything else

When bad things happen they result in emotional struggle. You know what that is – the dialogue you have with your inner voice.

It often talks us out of doing something we want to do. But, in times of turmoil it can be hard to figure out exactly what to do – and even what is going on. However, psychological distance can both help gain acceptance and an objective, rational view of our feelings.

Rational thinking is hard to do in the midst of harsh self-talk we are often subject to when things are tough. It’s like a radio with the sound turned up high. It’s telling us off and berating us. What we want to do, if only we could, is to turn the sound down. The good news is that researchers* have found that we can gain psychological distance and treat self-talk as just, well, thoughts. The struggle then becomes less real and less painful – and has less power over us.

The research* showed that a small change in your self-talk – using your name rather than I, me or mine (personal pronouns) – does the trick. Here are some illustrations to show the difference:

Table Shows Friendly, Positive and Rational Advice – Use Your name

Scenario Self-talk using personal pronoun Self-talk using your name
Henry’s fear of using escalators “I’m afraid to get on an escalator” “Henry, just step onto the escalator”
Grace goes blank in exams “I just can’t do exams” “Grace, of course you can. Just walk into the room and do the exam you’ve revised for”
Sophia is anxious when she meets new people and gets tongue tied “I’m an idiot for avoiding new people” “Sophia, you can talk to new people, just go and do it”
a small change in your self-talk makes it akin to giving a friend advice

Use your own name in self-talk – makes it friendly and positive

Psychological distance makes self-talk akin to giving a friend advice. It helps us to be kind, objective and rational, to think straight, in fact.

The ‘think straight’ researcher* was inspired to undertake his research when he heard Nobel peace prize winner Malala Yousafzai tell her self-talk story (http://ow.ly/RuQzu). Her self-talk dialogue goes like this:

Q: “If the Taliban comes, what would you do Malala?”

A: “Malala, just take a shoe and hit him.”

Malala is Malala Yousafzai, is the young Pakistani female education activist who was shot by the Taliban for daring to go to school. She is also the youngest-ever person to be awarded the Nobel peace prize.

If you want to know more about this research* there is an excellent Psychology Today article here https://www.psychologytoday.com/articles/201505/the-voice-reason

*Kross, E (et.al), (2014) Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Vol 106, No 22, 301-324

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499

E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people.

Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Certified ACT practioner
  • Support if you are being bullied, or have a member of your organisation who has made a bullying complaint
  • Certified Mediation practioner, to address workplace conflict,
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations
  • Special projects, secondments and assignments

Photos by:

  1. Courtesy of stockimages
  2. courtesy of Kittikun Atsawintarangkul at FreeDigitalPhotos.net
  3. courtesy of Malala Fund @MalalaFund

 

 

7 ways to clear team goals

Have clear team goals, goals that are clear as mud hold teams back

Have clear team goals and a positive team vibe to have both creativity and innovation, gin your team

Goals that are clear as mud hold teams back – here’s how to develop clear team goals

When a team has clear goals and enjoys a positive emotional vibe this will drive both creativity and innovation.*

But if goals are clear as mud, your team will definitely be held back from becoming the best it could.

Goal clarity builds motivation to be creative and innovative, and to take calculated risks.

Goal clarity also encourages teams to collaborate and pull together to achieve success. Even in tough times, clear goals can build certainty and help teams stay on track. They can then achieve high levels of productivity. Goal clarity and a positive emotional vibe are the foundations for high and consistent team performance.

7 ways to achieve goal clarity and flourish – and secure high team performance:

  1. Involve team members in developing, clarifying and prioritising team goals before undertaking any creative or innovative activity
  2. Build a positive emotional climate (see previous blog post [Positive Emotional Climate])
  3. Encourage team members to drive changes in their work processes
  4. Use team-building to get new team members, or new teams, established quickly with clear goals
  5. Explore and develop team values, and explore how the team will work together
  6. Provide coaching to help individual team members be flexible and develop a commitment to team goals
  7. Resolve interpersonal conflict and conflict between teams to create a positive team vibe

A positive emotional climate with clarity around team goals helps creativity and innovation become the norm and enables – and sustains – high levels of team productivity.

* Peralta, C.F. et al. (2015) Innovation processes and team effectiveness: The role of goal clarity and commitment, and team-affective tone, Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, vol 88, part 1, March

 

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499

E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people.

Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Certified ACT practioner
  • Support if you are being bullied, or have a member of your organisation who has made a bullying complaint
  • Certified Mediation practioner, to address workplace conflict,
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations
  • Special projects, secondments and assignments

4 ways to wisely balance work and home – avoid Smartphone overuse

“Do you have to use your Smartphone 24x7, you’re always working...?”

“Do you have to use your Smartphone 24×7, you’re always working…?”

“Do you have to use your Smartphone 24×7, you’re always working…?”…does this sound familiar? If so, then this blog is certainly one for you!

Think about today, have you experienced work-home interference from overusing your Smartphone? To ensure a happy lifestyle, we must ensure that we get this home life, work life balance right….and in many cases overusing our Smartphone’s can work to blur these lines.

In many cases this line blurring occurs when employers suggest their people should be available almost all of the time. This means many people stick glued to their mobiles phones to ensure they remain reachable…

But, don’t just take my work for it. Recent research has found that:

  • People who felt highly engaged at work tended to find effective ways to detach home from work
  • People who thought that their supervisor expected them to be highly available suffered high levels of home-work interference. Also, this tended to be a negative imbalance when experienced via their Smartphone off-duty at home
  • People who didn’t think that their supervisor expected them to be highly available suffered lower levels of home-work interference
  • High levels of work-home interference elevated stress, and lead to;
  • Deterioration of performance and reduction in life satisfaction.

So, how do we work to separate our home and work lives to ensure a happy balance? Well, here are 4 tips that should help:

  1. Supervisors by modelling good practice with their Smartphone, both at work and at home, demonstrate clear expectations and provide permission for their team to follow suit
  2. Supervisors should take care when they respond to work messages during leisure time, as they may inadvertently build expectations about constantly being available
  3. Organisations should positively engage with employees in order to reduce the impact of Smartphone use, and to positively set the scene for overt team agreement
  4. Supervisors are recommended to support team members by linking team values and expectations about Smartphone use with an agreement on team collaboration. This is often constructively done during a team review of what they do well when working together so they can do more of it.

So, put down your Smartphone and try and draw a line between your work and home life. You’ll thank me in the long run!

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499

E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people.

Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Certified ACT practioner
  • Support if you are being bullied, or have a member of your organisation who has made a bullying complaint
  • Certified Mediation practioner, to address workplace conflict,
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations
  • Special projects, secondments and assignments

Do You Let Change Rumours Breakdown Trust?

Change is emotional. Often, those impacted, or potentially impacted, ‘find out’ through the rumour mill. This inevitably leads to a lack of understanding about what a specific change may mean, and as a result can cause mangers to break expectations and perceived promises. Psychologists talk about this being a breach of the ‘psychological contract’. The ‘psychological contract’ exists as explicit and implicit understandings between employer and employee, or manager and direct reports, and also at a company level.

The ‘Psychological Contract’ is not obvious . It is important. Like an iceberg, most of it is hidden.

Change has the potential to breach psychological contracts and breakdown trust. Sometimes such a breach never heals. Therefore, its best to avoid breaches in the first place and this requires good communication to help people establish ‘what is in it for me’.

Change may have the potential to impact thousands of people at the same time. This can intensify emotions and unless communication is established it can also lead to industrial action. Therefore, organisations need to be aware of how they impact psychological contract at the overall company level and also what the leaders and supervisors are doing during times of change.

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499

E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people.

Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Special projects, secondments and assignments
  • Mediation, to address workplace conflict
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations

 

3 Things You Can Do to Survive Inconsistent Untrustworthy Leadership Behaviour

inconsistent behaviour destroys trust

Inconsistent behaviour is toxic and destroys trust

Inconsistent behaviour prevents trust from being built and sustained. It is hard to survive. Distrust is a toxic symptom that may occur when a leader behaves inconsistently. This management style can lead to employees feeling uncomfortable, unappreciated and even betrayed.

Read John’s story about his boss Annette shows:

“…Annette tells me to do a job, and then when it is done she somewhat petulantly points out the other things I have not done. Even though they were never discussed, and are sometimes at odds with what was agreed”. However, “…Annette tells me she knows she changes her mind. However, she does not seem to remember that when she next changes her mind. I think she thinks I am hopeless…”

So how does this make John feel?

“I can’t trust the direction she gives, not because it is bad, far from it, it’s just I know she will not like what I have done without realising she has changed her mind.”

“…I don’t mind that she changes her mind if she acknowledged it. Then I would not feel so blamed… maybe she would not appear so angry”

“I don’t commit to my work as I much as I would like as it is never good enough and after a while I just feel rubbish”

What are your thoughts on John’s story?

Three things that John can do:

1. Take some time to talk to Annette. Explain how he is feeling and ask her how she is

2. Agree some boundaries, keep Annette updated with what you have agreed and if she changes her mind than agree how to convey that to you

3. Protect himself, don’t take inconsistent behaviour personally

 

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499

E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people.

Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Special projects, secondments and assignments
  • Mediation, to address workplace conflict
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations

 

Do you judge people by their face – as if “judging a book by its cover”

Would you employ this person?

Would you employ this person?

Often we make judgments of others based on their facial features. Mostly, we are not even aware of it. Later, such judgments can appear hasty and ill-considered, downright unfair and wrong. Sometimes of course, we are right. The issue is that we may not know the reasons for being right. However, these sorts of judgments can affect our behaviour. It can be hard to change them, or to stop ourselves from making such judgments in real-time. Recent research by Tom Hartley (see more below) indicates that it’s useful to know how people in general tend to judge others based on first appearances. It may help us to understand how we as individuals may tend to judge others. 

Did she do a good job?

Did she do a good job?

This is particularly important to the world of work where we may make decisions and use judgments that may not be accurate. This may include decisions about important people issues, such as assessing performance, making new investments, recruiting new people or promoting people within the organisation already.

Did you decisions meet your personal and organisation's values?

Do your decisions meet your organisation’s values?

Making unwise decisions is bad enough but making unfair decisions can lead to discrimination, which is not only unfair and wrong, it is unlawful. A good source of support is ACAS . Read the blog from Tom Hartley  If you are interested in understanding what specific triggers can lead to hasty and ill-considered judgments then you can read more here: http://thermaltoy.wordpress.com/2014/07/28/first-impressions-count-but-how/

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499 E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people. Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Special projects, secondments and assignments
  • Mediation, to address workplace conflict
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations

Facebook research, manipulations hardly impacted individual behaviour

"I really expected bigger differences in behaviour  than that"

Despite uproar about Facebook ethics, experimental results had a tiny impact on each user

Surprise, was definitely how I felt when I read how little user behaviour was affected by the experimental manipulations:

    • 1On average, people used less than one fewer emotional word in every 1000 words in Facebook posts over the following week
  • That means the difference made by the experimental manipulations was tiny

Significant results?

Yes, say the researchers1 owing to the huge number of 689,003 Facebook users involved. Their data showed that emotional states can become virus like, therefore, easily transferred to others. Consequently, people experienced the same emotions as one another without realising it, and without directly interacting. Exposure to emotions in a friend’s Facebook post was enough. For more information see the British Psychological Society summary article here: http://ow.ly/yEjRy

Important results?

The researchers thought so. They pointed out with the massive scale of social networks such as Facebook; even small effects can have large overall impacts. Also, they thought that their findings might also be useful for relaying public health messages. However, I suspect that the manipulative aspect of their study may mean people feel nervous about how such recommendations are used. See my blog article about the ‘creepy or justifiable’ implications here: http://mwrconsulting.co.uk/?page_id=117

For an excellent summary of the research findings and the resulting ethical debate read a British Psychological Society article here: http://ow.ly/yEjRy

 

Kramer, A. D. I., Guillory, J. E., Hancock J. T. (2014), Experimental evidence of massive-scale emotional contagion through social networks, PNAS, 111 (24), 8788-8790

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499 E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people. Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Special projects, secondments and assignments
  • Mediation, to address workplace conflict
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations

Facebook research, creepy or justifiable?

It's called social media for a reason, nothing is private

It’s called social media for a reason, nothing is private

If you felt that recent Facebook research was a step too far, so did many others. However, many people were far from surprised. There was a grudging recognition that Facebook, and potentially other social media organisations, manipulate users and readers all the time. Yet, whether Facebook crossed an ethical line that will result in further repercussions from their users remains to be seen.

An excellent summary of the research findings and the resulting ethical debate was given by the British Psychological Society.

You can read it here:  http://ow.ly/yEjRy

 

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499

E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people.

Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Special projects, secondments and assignments
  • Mediation, to address workplace conflict
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations

Are you blind to toxic behaviours that destroy trust?

Spot toxic leadership

Spot toxic leadership

In my last blog I discussed how inconsistent behaviour destroys trust. Imagine then how it feels if a leader or team member is suffering from a personality disordered or experiencing a period of mental ill-health? Often a toxic environment develops. This is particularly difficult when it is the leaders whose behaviour is problematic.

The work environment may feel unstable, contradictory and ultimately toxic; within an environment like this it is hard to flourish and almost always leads to a feeling of distrust.

A leader with a personality disorder also shows further destructive behaviours within their personal relationships at work. Personality disordered leaders, for example narcissists, often attain promotion in organisations. If you’d like more information have a look at my earlier blog ‘Charming the birds off the trees’. Click here http://mwrconsulting.co.uk/?p=243: .

If you have toxic leadership in your organisation then ensure you act now to get them the help and support that they need.

Things you can do:

  1. Provide a Corporate governance framework and policies that ensure welfare by holding key individuals accountable. Specifically:
      1.  Consider the use of upwards and 360 degree appraisal the performance management process
      2. Implement a whistle-blowing mechanism that provides anonymity for concerned people to call out a problem
  2. Build, motivate and provide direction to leadership teams throughout the organisation
  3. Set clear vision, strategy, objectives and goals
  4. Coach and train and support people:
      1.  Many people experiencing difficult and emotionally draining life experiences when given support and understanding will recover their functioning. Organisations that do this well often find that trust in the organisation, its leaders and within teams may be successfully rebuilt.
      2. However, those people with unhealthy or disordered behaviours are unlikely to believe there is any need for them to be coached. They are unlikely to have the motivation to change. If they do accept the idea, identify a coach with in-depth experience of coaching personality disorders.
  5. Where evidence arises about distrust that seems to point to the dark side of an individual leader, the organisation should be prepared to act.
  6. Some personality disorders can cause such organisational havoc that it is best to avoid employing them in the first place. For more information see my earlier blog here: http://mwrconsulting.co.uk/?p=339

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499

E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people.

Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Special projects, secondments and assignments
  • Mediation, to address workplace conflict
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations