How to Appreciate Your Colleagues This Christmas – Enjoy Team Bonding

Happy Christmas

Happy Christmas

We’ve all heard the old joke  – ‘what I don’t like about work Christmas parties is….looking for a job the next day’ [fill in your examples].

Here are three ways to show appreciation for your colleagues at Christmas.

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

T: 07779 345 499

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people.

Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Certified ACT practitioner
  • Support if you are being bullied, or have a member of your organisation who has made a bullying complaint
  • Certified Mediation practioner, to address workplace conflict,
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations
  • Special projects, secondments and assignments

Photo by kantapat. Published on 28 November 2014

Is the salary-linked annual performance review dead?

Use perfromance management to coach your people and provide frequent, on-going feedback

Use performance management to coach your people and provide frequent, on-going feedback

When big names like Accenture, Adobe, Microsoft and GAP all announce they have stopped linking salary increases to annual performance reviews this underscores the fact that some organisations’ performance management techniques just don’t work.

Organisations are moving towards a wider distribution of leadership roles, as well as more flexible working (both location and hours). Along with this has come a flatter hierarchy and an increasing need for quick action. Given this, your leadership style and skills may need to be updated to make performance management more meaningful. How is your leadership style developing?

As a leader you need to have a positive attitude to performance management. When it is used in an ongoing fashion, and focuses on both individuals and teams, leaders can use it to create a highly motivated workplace.

This happens when you involve your people so that they use their team voice in helping identify good performance. Together you can develop appropriate, fair and relevant measurements that also align with company strategy. Performance evaluation needs to take place with an understanding of the challenges and issues that may not have been within the team or the individual’s control – essential to ensure assessments are fair.

To do this well, you may need training to improve your ability to tailor ongoing performance management. The best training for leaders balances both technical and soft skills. But such an effort is worthwhile because it will allow you to use ongoing positive performance management to motivate your people well – to support them in times of need; and to praise them for good work, and recognise extra effort – and be seen in a positive light to promote team bonds. Remember not everyone has a preference for receiving feedback so gauge the predominant feedback preference of your team members.

Is the salary-linked annual performance review dead? In large organisations the press seem to think so. More important is the desire and need for performance management to focus on people-development rather than people-payment no matter. Therefore, involve your people to help identify good performance. Collaborating together provides a chance that the performance management systems and techniques will be meaningful, motivating and align both your work and that of your people to organisational strategy.

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

T: 07779 345 499

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people.

Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Certified ACT practioner
  • Support if you are being bullied, or have a member of your organisation who has made a bullying complaint
  • Certified Mediation practioner, to address workplace conflict,
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations
  • Special projects, secondments and assignments

Photo by nenetus

How to use mindfulness to support your people during changing times

mindful walking

Mindfulness can be done anytime, during a walk is ideal

Meditation is now being used to help people deal with the stress change in the workplace brings. Called ‘Mindfulness’, it can be used for a short time every day – with big results.

Anyone can learn Mindfulness. It’s simple yet challenging. You can do it anywhere, at any time, and the results have been shown to be life changing.

To recap, this form of meditation can be done anywhere to help stop you becoming engulfed by the mind’s emotional ‘chatter’, so it doesn’t control you.

Here are some ideas on how to be mindful:

It can be helpful to pick a particular time – your journey to and from work or during a lunchtime walk – to actively notice your thoughts, feelings and bodily sensations, and the world around you. Try doing this today: find a new lunch spot or sit in a different seat when travelling to work. Now examine your surroundings, such as the air moving past you; or look at an item in detail (a raisin, a sweet wrapper).

Be mindful during a walk

Be mindful during a walk

Examples could include:

  1. Sensations – the food you are eating, the air moving past your body as you walk, your breathing…
  2. Colour
  3. Sound
  4. Smell
  5. Taste

Now, notice the chatter going on in your mind. Observe your thoughts as they float past. Don’t try to change them or debate them, or judge them – just observe them. Practice helps, so this ‘chatter’ doesn’t become yet another mental event that controls you.

Does this sound like a small thing to you? Yes, it is, but it’s straightforward too. However, it is proven to help us engage more in the everyday activities we often bypass as we are often on autopilot. In this way, we gain a fresh view of the world – and our place in it.

When to use it:

Whenever you can and especially when you experience several moments that see you dwelling on unsettling, possibly distressing, memories – the kind that involves you reliving the event. You may find it helps to silently name these thoughts and feelings as they emerge. For example: “I am worrying”; “I’m not good enough to do this”.

Please get in touch with Marjorie Raymond, on 07779 345 499, or email m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk, if you would like to talk about Mindfulness.

My next blog post will look in detail at ACT, Mindfulness’ relative, and how it has been used to help people and organisations during times of change – and as an ongoing part of employee wellbeing and engagement activities. ACT stand for Acceptance and Commitment Therapy.

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499

E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people.

Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Support if you are being bullied, or have a member of your organisation who has made a bullying complaint
  • Mediation, to address workplace conflict
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations
  • Special projects, secondments and assignments

 

 

 

 

Three Ways to Show You Appreciate Your Colleagues this Christmas

Being appreciated is a motivational experience

Being appreciated is a motivational experience

Being appreciated makes working together a positive experience

Taking the opportunity to encourage your team, deepen bonds and appreciate one another is a positive aspect of Christmas. It provides us with a moment in dark mid-winter to consider those we work with.

Take my colleague Ed, for example. Ed’s strength is his enthusiasm. He gets excited about ideas and people. He is always passionate, interested and positive about what the team does. A few months ago we were given some work most of us thought was boring. Not Ed though. He had us seeing the importance of the work, and his enthusiasm helped everyone do a great job. What would we do without him? Has anyone told Ed this, specifically? Probably not. Yet it would certainly show appreciation to do so.

So, here are three steps your team could take, ideally in a team get-together, to show appreciation. However, if you can’t be together then you could use email, cards or even calls instead.

  1. Each person takes a moment to think about each team member and note a valuable strength each person has and how it would feel to be in the team without that strength. There are many strengths to choose from. For example, you may have colleagues who have good ideas or who communicate well, who are dependable or who know their own mind. There are colleagues who are the life and soul of the team, who bring a splash of colour and original thinking to the team, who can sell an idea or who are excellent with detail. There are also people who develop solutions or are well organised, or are loyal and, so on. You should have a list of colleagues linked to their valuable strengths.
  2. Now each person should think of a time when he or she saw each person use their particular strength. What was it that made you smile and appreciate that person?
  3. And now each team member should take it in turns to share their appreciation of each other’s strengths and what makes them smile when they see these strengths being used.

If you can’t all be together, or someone is missing or you feel that people would appreciate a less public approach, then consider an email, a card or a call. Being appreciated makes working together a positive experience.

ID-100167019

If you can’t show appreciation face to face then consider an email, a card or a call

Enjoy Christmas by showing appreciation for your colleagues.

Have a Merry Christmas.

 

 

 

 

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499

E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people.

Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Team development and team building
  • Support if you are being bullied, or have a member of your organisation who has made a bullying complaint
  • Mediation, to address workplace conflict
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations
  • Special projects, secondments and assignments

 

Not Everyone Feels Empowered by Feedback!

Some people are not empowered by recieiving feedback

The feedback environment created by supervisors can develop employee empowerment

Supervisors need to be encouraged to move away from a ‘one-size fits all’ feedback environment, in order to support employee empowerment. A feedback environment is created by informal, daily feedback exchanges between supervisors and team members. Research1 shows that receiving feedback is not always enough to increase an employee’s perception of empowerment. The researchers found that:

  • Supervisors who created a positive feedback environment were more likely to help employees both feel comfortable to receive feedback, and also find work meaningful. Meaningful work linked organisational expectations of jobs with individual beliefs, values and employee empowerment
  • Individuals with a preference for receiving feedback found work meaningful, had a positive supervisor relationship and felt empowered.
  • Individuals who were not comfortable receiving feedback tended to be less likely to find meaning at work, had a less positive relationship with their supervisor and felt less empowered than those who were comfortable receiving feedback.
Hold conversations

Employees without a preference for receiving feedback may not feel empowered

Therefore, supervisors should be supported to gauge the predominant feedback preference among team members. Where a majority of employees prefer receiving feedback, a high feedback environment created by the supervisor would be valuable. However, where employees have a low preference for feedback, a minimal feedback environment may be advantageous.

 

1 Gabriel, Frantz, Levy and Hilliard, (2014) The Supervisor feedback environment is empowering, but not all the time: Feedback orientation as a critical moderator, Journal of Occupational and Organisational Psychology, 87, 487-506

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499

E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people.

Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Special projects, secondments and assignments
  • Mediation, to address workplace conflict
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level

Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations

Top tips about how to use Job-crafting to personalise and advance employee engagement

Involve as many of your people as we practically can.

Collaborative team job-crafting positively advances employee engagement and team performance

Compliance to best practice, and especially LEAN principles, demand tight control of work practices to secure efficiency. However, sometimes ‘best practice’ may lack specific contextual relevance. This may result in work lacking in meaning, organisations experiencing low employee engagement that adversely impacts performance.

 

However, researchers1 studying three call centres found that when supervisors support their teams to make informal adjustments to procedures and processes, known as ‘job-crafting’, this resulted in higher employee engagement and team performance. Job-crafting met team needs for control and helped make their work meaningful. Researchers also revealed that job-crafting built connections with other team members and aided collaboration between teams. So, how did job-crafting work in the 3 call centres studied?

The researchers received two surprises:

  • call centre teams – notoriously low in control – were capable of complying both with standardised LEAN approaches and job-crafting. For example, after a customer call, during ‘wrap up’ to complete actions and update records, job-crafting allowed individuals and teams to experiment and try new approaches
  • team supervisors actively supported individual and team job-crafting. They helped target and set boundaries around tasks and procedures that were available to be job-crafted.

The researchers recommended 5 things that firms should do:

1. Develop supervisor practices to foster team job-crafting

2. Encourage and support supervisors to foster team social and task cohesion

3. Create a climate that encourages experimentation and sharing of new working methods and document them

4. Provide boundaries and develop areas within which team job-crafting can take place and encourage it – talk about it- share it

5. Undertake team training to help teams to think widely about the kind of issues where job-crafting would be suitable.

Call centre supervisors and managers need to recognise the benefits from targeted team based job-crafting.

1 McClelland, G.P., Leach, D.J., Clegg, C.W., McGowan, I. (2014) Collaborative crafting in call centre teams, Journal of Occupational Psychology, 87, 464-486

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499

E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people.

Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Special projects, secondments and assignments
  • Mediation, to address workplace conflict
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations

Top tips for retaining your culture and values over time

Values provide a sense of of purpose  and meaning

Values provide a sense of of purpose, direction  and meaning

Good to see research driven tips about culture and values.

Culture and values are powerful signals that have an important function. They help your people and customers understand what it is you are about, what you stand for as a firm and, as they are unique to you they define you.

If organisational culture is not driven by values then people tend to behave inconsistently and this adversely impacts trust.

Below is a link to more information.  Here you are a summary of – top tips from @CIPD and @CIM: http://ow.ly/xSmwS

The summary also takes you to CIPD where you can download the report, The report is a good and helpful read..

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499
E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk
We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people.
Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:
 Special projects, secondments and assignments
 Mediation, to address workplace conflict
 Personal development activities
 Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
 Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
 Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
 Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations

 

Does your Social Media activity motivate your people?

Using Social Media can increase the motivation of your people

Using Social Media can increase the motivation of your people

Evidence suggests that an organisations external Social Media activity has a hugely positive impact on employee motivation. Specifically, organisations are finding that their external Social Media platforms most notably, Facebook, LinkedIn and Google+, are of interest to their own employees. These individuals frequently and enthusiastically support their company’s Social Media activity through ‘likes’ and ‘favourites’. Why you may ask? Well, this helps employees feel empowered; by breaking down traditional organisational silos, it allows all employees to not only see what is going on within the company but to also feel part of the business through supportive social media activities. In a nutshell, employees value being in touch with external communication messages, giving them an internal importance that was not possible before. This is also a benefit to businesses, having social media support from their staff allows brand messages to be spread much further and thus these employees quickly become important internal communication assets! This is good news for employee communication; active use of social media has resulted in employees reporting higher levels of commitment and attachment and as a result has added more value to their own job. Surprisingly perhaps, researchers did not find that Social Media use increased employees own ‘sense of belonging’, also referred to as social cohesion.

Employees sometimes 'favourite' their firms external social media communication

Employees sometimes ‘favourite’ their firms external social media communication

However, organisations need to learn how to harness positive outcomes from their Social Media activity and link it to their internal communication strategies. Therefore, it is worth investing in the new Social Media skills and competencies required for success. Consideration should also be given to how HR strategies can be developed and communicated using the kind of communication techniques that may, until now, have been the focus of marketing activity for customers. Implications for not engaging or motivating people in your organisation may not only result in lost opportunities, but may also create much more damaging reputational consequences.

 

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499 E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people. Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Special projects, secondments and assignments
  • Mediation, to address workplace conflict
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations

How to get people to behave the way you want in the workplace

You can motivate people – in other words, reward work well done

You can motivate people – in other words, reward work well done

Coaching can help people chose alternative behaviours. But for managers to make good coaches for team members they need to ‘walk the talk’.

However, they need first need to understand the value of ‘walking the talk’, and this involves open communication and follow-through, and treating others as you would like to be treated yourself.

Here’s the good, the bad and the ugly of workplace feedback – what works, and what really doesn’t:

  • You can motivate people – in other words, reward work well done
  • You can praise people. For example, if you have a lazy team member, you can require that tasks be completed in a certain time-frame and to a certain quality standard, and then provide positive feedback when the tasks are completed successfully
  • You could use negative reinforcement – constantly ask or tell a person to do something, and scold too
  • You could also punish the person. This is a firm favourite – it usually fails

To help get it right, use the table below. The ‘hot’ colours show what works best, the cool colours, featuring far too frequently used techniques, shows what really doesn’t work.

This table shows how to get people to behave the way you want in the workplace - use the 'hot' coloured behaviours

This table shows how to get people to behave the way you want in the workplace – use the ‘hot’ coloured behaviours

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499

E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people.

Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Mediation, to address workplace conflict
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Personal development activities
  • Special projects, secondments and assignments
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations  

 

Take action – don’t let bad management behaviour derail your train

Bad management behaviour is catching

Bad management behaviour is catching

Poor behaviour exhibited by senior leaders sets the tone for everyone, especially if this behaviour is habitual and automatic, and engaged in without the person even realising it. This breeds acceptance that this standard of behaviour is OK for everyone. Just look at ‘The News of the World’ phone hacking scandal as an example.

Addressing such behaviour, which can derail corporate governance, will add value to your organisation, especially when tension, hostility and conflict are common, and individuals or teams are underperforming. Such behaviour can also lead to low levels of employee engagement and a situation where trust has been broken and dissatisfaction sets in.

However, a considered approach to developing ‘best behaviours’ can help. Good initiatives include:

  • Developing a mediation service, to help reconcile conflict
  • Acknowledging, using and acting upon upward appraisal
  • Developing whistle-blowing mechanisms and encouraging their use
  • Measuring leaders’ attempts to silence, bully or exclude employees who report misdeeds
  • Striking a balance between over and under-governance regulation towards individual accountability.

These initiatives will allow positive beliefs and values to develop. But you do need to take action – and we can help.

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499

E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

We have experience in developing senior managers and their teams – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people.

Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Mediation, to address workplace conflict
  • Individual coaching
  • Special projects, secondments and assignments
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Personal development activities
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations  Continue reading