Three ways to help team members commit support to each other

Commit to helping each another will develop your team spirit.

teams who commit to helping each other lift their team performance

Teams who commit to helping each other lift their team performance

Have a team voice: involve your team in issues that affect them, give them their voice and listen to what they say. Help team colleagues to identify when and who may need help. Then support and show gratitude to each other when help is received.

Stretching team goals provide a unifying focal point

Stretching team goals provide a unifying focal point

 

 

Make the team mean something: have stretching team goals that have a purpose, are clear and also compelling in order to be a unifying focal point. Talk about your team goals when you are together. Put team goals into the limelight so they mobilise your team spirit. Goals need clear finish lines, so you all know when they have been achieved.

 

Pride (2)Celebrate the big and little wins: This can be as simple as a thank you and well done. It’s about taking a moment, all together, to enjoy and learn together about what works well for you as a team – see previous blog about appreciation.

 

Building an effective team happens through leadership and team involvement. It is supported with authentic gratitude and a shared team vision.

This is the third blog about how to help your team to be the best it can and be successful. The principles below can deepen team bonds when implemented well and greatly improve team performance.

Principles:

  • Observe confidentiality
  • Appreciate statements that each team member makes
  • Commit to helping each other
  • Give everyone a chance to speak and support each person’s contribution

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499

E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people.

Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Certified ACT practioner
  • Support if you are being bullied, or have a member of your organisation who has made a bullying complaint
  • Certified Mediation practioner, to address workplace conflict,
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations
  • Special projects, secondments and assignments

Appreciation goes a very long way indeed in team-building

Appreciation is an often neglected aspect of building effectiveness

Appreciation is an often neglected aspect of building effectiveness

In my last blog post I introduced you to the principles that promote a safe team environment:

  • Observe confidentiality
  • Appreciate statements that each team member makes
  • Commit to helping each other
  • Give everyone a chance to speak – and support each person’s contribution

I talked about principle one: confidentiality [Nhttp://mwrconsulting.co.uk/?p=9652] now I am going to look at principle two: appreciation.

Why?

It is an often neglected aspect of building effectiveness. What a shame. Appreciation conveys a recognition of both the team and its individual members. Here are three ‘appreciative’ tips to help you appreciate each other:

  1. Say ‘thank you’ to one another for doing good work; for sharing information, and for giving and receiving help. Such appreciation also builds the foundation for being appreciated in return.
  2. Agree with your team colleagues that you will validate and appreciate each other’s statements, whether or not you agree with them. This can be done by saying, “Yes, and…

Let’s take a closer look at the “Yes, and…” approach.

Jack, a member of your team, recommends to you all that a team charter that covers the social aspects of team effectiveness would help the team a lot. The first response comes from Evie, who says, Yes, and then we can use it with new team members and when people are seconded to help us.”

It works because ‘yes’ accepts and appreciates the contribution made, and this enables deeper collaboration.

And the “and…” adds to the acceptance and appreciation shown by encouraging new information to be added. Hence the expression: yes and 1Pro

  1. The team can also express appreciation and provide challenging questions that develop ideas by responding with:

yes and 1Pro …that sounds interesting…

Or, “that makes me think….” Before offering their own contribution.

These three appreciative tips work well to create a space where everyone can be heard.

Photo by Ambro

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499

E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people.

Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Certified ACT practioner
  • Support if you are being bullied, or have a member of your organisation who has made a bullying complaint
  • Certified Mediation practioner, to address workplace conflict,
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations
  • Special projects, secondments and assignments

Three ways to build a team using confidentiality and information-sharing

You can help your team to be the best it can and be successful.

Involve as many of your people as we practically can.

Build a successful team – use 4 principles to create a psychologically safe team environment

The principles below can deepen team bonds when implemented well and greatly improve team performance.

4 Principles that build a psychologically safe team environment:

  • Observe confidentiality
  • Appreciate statements that each team member makes
  • Commit to helping each other
  • Give everyone a chance to speak and support each person’s contribution
Breaches of team confidentiality breaks trust - potentially beyond repair

Breaches of team confidentiality breaks trust – potentially beyond repair

Once in place, these principles help create a safe work environment. In this blog post I am going to take a closer look at confidentiality. Why? Well it’s easy to take confidentiality for granted. But such complacency leads to gaffes and the kind of confidentiality breaches that can damage trust beyond repair. Experience shows that being clear about confidentiality helps team members realise just how important it is.

There are three steps involved in securing and building confidentiality:

  1. Clarity – be clear about what can and can’t be shared

From the outset, your team should agree to keep the content team dialogues confidential.

  1. Realism – be realistic about the sharing of learning

It makes sense to define and agree on what can be shared outside of team dialogues. A positive approach to this is to treat team dialogues as a learning opportunity. This encourages team members to use what they have learnt. In this way, the team builds the supportive conditions necessary for knowledge sharing.

It’s also important to agree on what should not be shared with those not on the team. Team members need to be clear about why certain information can’t be shared so everyone understands the implications. Specifically, information sharing shouldn’t include verbatim reports of who said what (good or bad) nor elaborate examples of conflict, or moments that may have been difficult and distressing for the team.

  1. Purpose – of confidentiality

Confidentiality, when clarified, works because valuable insights from information sharing build team knowledge. This is important since information sharing has been consistently shown to enhance team effectiveness and productivity, and, hence, performance.

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499

E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people.

Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Certified ACT practioner
  • Support if you are being bullied, or have a member of your organisation who has made a bullying complaint
  • Certified Mediation practioner, to address workplace conflict,
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations
  • Special projects, secondments and assignments

5 Reasons to Use Appreciative Change – Be the Best You Can Be

to be the best by appreciating their strengths

Appreciative Change  leads organisations’s to be the best by appreciating their strengths

Appreciative Inquiry is effective. It helps people hold conversations, dialogues, and tell stories that identify what they are good at. It also makes it easy for people to express the ways in which they work best, including processes, systems, techniques and, knowledge. Appreciative Inquiry has been, and continues to be, successfully used within organisations for specific teams and for coaching individuals.

At a meeting recently a senior business leader said:

“There is something wrong with my people they don’t like change, they don’t get it”

He was frustrated and was continuously trying to sell change to his employees, with no avail. However, during our conversation we talked about ‘Appreciative Inquiry’ and he accepted that his assumptions almost guaranteed resistance.

He asked me what may work instead. For me, collaboration and crafting the way forward with those who will be most affected has always proven to be effective, owing to:

  1. Co-creation and crafting the future: uses the knowledge and experience of people who are likely to have the greatest impact. They test out the thinking with one another and typically create even better solutions.
  2. Participation: actively self generates energy, enthusiasm and commitment. People ‘get it’ as they understand the context and need for something to happen rather than be told to change. Implementation quickly follows.
  3. Involvement of people: to design and refine the detail. This develops deeper commitment and people begin to spontaneously share progress and invite others to help refine the design.
  4. Strengths of people, systems and processes: are harnessed and people shine a light on what the organisation, teams and individuals do best.
  5. Problems are replaced by innovation as conversations increasingly shift toward uncovering the organisation’s (or team’s/community’s) positive core.

So why don’t all organisations work this way? Appreciative Inquiry requires leaders and their organisations to demonstrate a different style of leadership. They need to ‘let go a little more’ as a leader once said to me, and “become focussed and genuinely interested in helping the organisation to be the best by appreciating their strengths”. She saw her job as “generating hope and helping my people to travel hopefully and optimistically’. It was great to see her people do just that.

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499

E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people.

Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Special projects, secondments and assignments
  • Mediation, to address workplace conflict
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations