How to Appreciate Your Colleagues This Christmas – Enjoy Team Bonding

Happy Christmas

Happy Christmas

We’ve all heard the old joke  – ‘what I don’t like about work Christmas parties is….looking for a job the next day’ [fill in your examples].

Here are three ways to show appreciation for your colleagues at Christmas.

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

T: 07779 345 499

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people.

Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Certified ACT practitioner
  • Support if you are being bullied, or have a member of your organisation who has made a bullying complaint
  • Certified Mediation practioner, to address workplace conflict,
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations
  • Special projects, secondments and assignments

Photo by kantapat. Published on 28 November 2014

Do you know what your values are and is your life guided by them?

CT aligns individual and team values with organisational goals

CT aligns individual and team values with organisational goals

When we are guided by values our life is easier.

Do you know what your values are and is your life guided by them?

Values are an important guide on your journey through life. They guide your direction, and your behaviour stems from them. When we are guided by values our life is easier. And when we are in conflict with them we feel upset, frustrated and perhaps even angry.

What are values?

Values are what you want to stand for deep in your heart*. Answering these questions will help you discover what yours are:

  • What do you want your life to be about?
  • What sort of things do you most want to do?
  • What type of person do you most want to be?
  • How do you want to be in your relationships with others?
  • What would you like to be remembered for by the people you love?

How do values work?

A value is like a lighthouse seen in the distance. It guides you through your journey in life, in good times as well as in challenging and difficult times.

Why are they important?

Values help you to pursue what matters to you; they aren’t goals. Rather, they are the personal choices you make about the direction of your life. (They are not about what you should, must or have to do.) Clarity about your values also gives you pointers to your goals and the actions that will help you move in your chosen direction. Values bring vitality and a sense of purpose to life.

Having clarity about your values means that you know where you are going and don’t have to keep checking you are on course. However, having clear values doesn’t ensure a straight path through life. Often you may need to change direction to get back to your values.

Values are usually stable, yet may change over time to reflect your achievements. Noticing your values change in this way represents small steps taken regarding the overall direction you have chosen. So, it’s important to stay in touch with your values, so as to support your ‘valued’ direction.

What values aren’t

Goals are way-markers along your chosen path. They can be achieved. You can tick them off and identify what you have achieved. Values, however, are behaviours we believe are important. So, you can’t achieve a value; rather you live using your values as a guide.

Individuals and teams who identify their values reap many benefits:

  • Individuals who understand their values gain insight into the behaviours that support them. This includes, for example, how they may vote, make consumer choices or choose an occupation.
  • Behaviours that are consistent with values help keep us going in our chosen direction. And behaving consistently builds trust.
  • Behaviours aligned to values develop individuals’ well-being

 Exercises to help people understand their values

  1. How to help individuals identify their values

Jump ahead to your 80th birthday party. All your friends and family, colleagues, and loved ones are there. It’s a good turn-out – imagine that all the people you have ever cared about are able to attend. Now the cake arrives. After you blow out your 80 candles everyone takes turns to talk about your personal qualities and key strengths.

Your task is this: what three things you would most want these people to say about the kind of person you have been in life? Choose whatever you want them to say about your personal qualities and key strengths. And remember: it’s your imaginary party, so please feel free to highlight what you would really want to hear people say about you on your Big Day.

  1. How to help a team identify and share their values

Before working with a team check that everyone agrees to share their top three values with each other. Start by using the exercise above, so everyone has a chance to identify their own values. Now, pair everyone up. Each partner then gets a turn at introducing the other partner – name and what job they do – and then tells everyone what the three things are that their partner would most want people to say at their 80th birthday party.

What do values look like when they have been identified?

The example below comes from an ACT coaching session with Eva. Eva is a project manager with a large UK insurance company. Her top three values are:

  • Being a loving and caring wife and mother
  • Being healthy, mentally and physically
  • Being a valued team member

* Adapted from: Harris, R (2008)The Happiness Trap (Based on ACT: A revolutionary mindfulness-based programme for overcoming stress, anxiety and depression), Robinson

Russ is very generous with materials. You can find some more here: http://www.actmindfully.com.au/

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499

E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people.

Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Certified ACT practioner
  • Support if you are being bullied, or have a member of your organisation who has made a bullying complaint
  • Certified Mediation practioner, to address workplace conflict,
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations
  • Special projects, secondments and assignments

 

Three ways to help team members commit support to each other

Commit to helping each another will develop your team spirit.

teams who commit to helping each other lift their team performance

Teams who commit to helping each other lift their team performance

Have a team voice: involve your team in issues that affect them, give them their voice and listen to what they say. Help team colleagues to identify when and who may need help. Then support and show gratitude to each other when help is received.

Stretching team goals provide a unifying focal point

Stretching team goals provide a unifying focal point

 

 

Make the team mean something: have stretching team goals that have a purpose, are clear and also compelling in order to be a unifying focal point. Talk about your team goals when you are together. Put team goals into the limelight so they mobilise your team spirit. Goals need clear finish lines, so you all know when they have been achieved.

 

Pride (2)Celebrate the big and little wins: This can be as simple as a thank you and well done. It’s about taking a moment, all together, to enjoy and learn together about what works well for you as a team – see previous blog about appreciation.

 

Building an effective team happens through leadership and team involvement. It is supported with authentic gratitude and a shared team vision.

This is the third blog about how to help your team to be the best it can and be successful. The principles below can deepen team bonds when implemented well and greatly improve team performance.

Principles:

  • Observe confidentiality
  • Appreciate statements that each team member makes
  • Commit to helping each other
  • Give everyone a chance to speak and support each person’s contribution

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499

E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people.

Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Certified ACT practioner
  • Support if you are being bullied, or have a member of your organisation who has made a bullying complaint
  • Certified Mediation practioner, to address workplace conflict,
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations
  • Special projects, secondments and assignments

Appreciation goes a very long way indeed in team-building

Appreciation is an often neglected aspect of building effectiveness

Appreciation is an often neglected aspect of building effectiveness

In my last blog post I introduced you to the principles that promote a safe team environment:

  • Observe confidentiality
  • Appreciate statements that each team member makes
  • Commit to helping each other
  • Give everyone a chance to speak – and support each person’s contribution

I talked about principle one: confidentiality [Nhttp://mwrconsulting.co.uk/?p=9652] now I am going to look at principle two: appreciation.

Why?

It is an often neglected aspect of building effectiveness. What a shame. Appreciation conveys a recognition of both the team and its individual members. Here are three ‘appreciative’ tips to help you appreciate each other:

  1. Say ‘thank you’ to one another for doing good work; for sharing information, and for giving and receiving help. Such appreciation also builds the foundation for being appreciated in return.
  2. Agree with your team colleagues that you will validate and appreciate each other’s statements, whether or not you agree with them. This can be done by saying, “Yes, and…

Let’s take a closer look at the “Yes, and…” approach.

Jack, a member of your team, recommends to you all that a team charter that covers the social aspects of team effectiveness would help the team a lot. The first response comes from Evie, who says, Yes, and then we can use it with new team members and when people are seconded to help us.”

It works because ‘yes’ accepts and appreciates the contribution made, and this enables deeper collaboration.

And the “and…” adds to the acceptance and appreciation shown by encouraging new information to be added. Hence the expression: yes and 1Pro

  1. The team can also express appreciation and provide challenging questions that develop ideas by responding with:

yes and 1Pro …that sounds interesting…

Or, “that makes me think….” Before offering their own contribution.

These three appreciative tips work well to create a space where everyone can be heard.

Photo by Ambro

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499

E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people.

Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Certified ACT practioner
  • Support if you are being bullied, or have a member of your organisation who has made a bullying complaint
  • Certified Mediation practioner, to address workplace conflict,
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations
  • Special projects, secondments and assignments

Three ways to build a team using confidentiality and information-sharing

You can help your team to be the best it can and be successful.

Involve as many of your people as we practically can.

Build a successful team – use 4 principles to create a psychologically safe team environment

The principles below can deepen team bonds when implemented well and greatly improve team performance.

4 Principles that build a psychologically safe team environment:

  • Observe confidentiality
  • Appreciate statements that each team member makes
  • Commit to helping each other
  • Give everyone a chance to speak and support each person’s contribution
Breaches of team confidentiality breaks trust - potentially beyond repair

Breaches of team confidentiality breaks trust – potentially beyond repair

Once in place, these principles help create a safe work environment. In this blog post I am going to take a closer look at confidentiality. Why? Well it’s easy to take confidentiality for granted. But such complacency leads to gaffes and the kind of confidentiality breaches that can damage trust beyond repair. Experience shows that being clear about confidentiality helps team members realise just how important it is.

There are three steps involved in securing and building confidentiality:

  1. Clarity – be clear about what can and can’t be shared

From the outset, your team should agree to keep the content team dialogues confidential.

  1. Realism – be realistic about the sharing of learning

It makes sense to define and agree on what can be shared outside of team dialogues. A positive approach to this is to treat team dialogues as a learning opportunity. This encourages team members to use what they have learnt. In this way, the team builds the supportive conditions necessary for knowledge sharing.

It’s also important to agree on what should not be shared with those not on the team. Team members need to be clear about why certain information can’t be shared so everyone understands the implications. Specifically, information sharing shouldn’t include verbatim reports of who said what (good or bad) nor elaborate examples of conflict, or moments that may have been difficult and distressing for the team.

  1. Purpose – of confidentiality

Confidentiality, when clarified, works because valuable insights from information sharing build team knowledge. This is important since information sharing has been consistently shown to enhance team effectiveness and productivity, and, hence, performance.

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499

E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people.

Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Certified ACT practioner
  • Support if you are being bullied, or have a member of your organisation who has made a bullying complaint
  • Certified Mediation practioner, to address workplace conflict,
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations
  • Special projects, secondments and assignments

7 ways to clear team goals

Have clear team goals, goals that are clear as mud hold teams back

Have clear team goals and a positive team vibe to have both creativity and innovation, gin your team

Goals that are clear as mud hold teams back – here’s how to develop clear team goals

When a team has clear goals and enjoys a positive emotional vibe this will drive both creativity and innovation.*

But if goals are clear as mud, your team will definitely be held back from becoming the best it could.

Goal clarity builds motivation to be creative and innovative, and to take calculated risks.

Goal clarity also encourages teams to collaborate and pull together to achieve success. Even in tough times, clear goals can build certainty and help teams stay on track. They can then achieve high levels of productivity. Goal clarity and a positive emotional vibe are the foundations for high and consistent team performance.

7 ways to achieve goal clarity and flourish – and secure high team performance:

  1. Involve team members in developing, clarifying and prioritising team goals before undertaking any creative or innovative activity
  2. Build a positive emotional climate (see previous blog post [Positive Emotional Climate])
  3. Encourage team members to drive changes in their work processes
  4. Use team-building to get new team members, or new teams, established quickly with clear goals
  5. Explore and develop team values, and explore how the team will work together
  6. Provide coaching to help individual team members be flexible and develop a commitment to team goals
  7. Resolve interpersonal conflict and conflict between teams to create a positive team vibe

A positive emotional climate with clarity around team goals helps creativity and innovation become the norm and enables – and sustains – high levels of team productivity.

* Peralta, C.F. et al. (2015) Innovation processes and team effectiveness: The role of goal clarity and commitment, and team-affective tone, Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, vol 88, part 1, March

 

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499

E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people.

Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Certified ACT practioner
  • Support if you are being bullied, or have a member of your organisation who has made a bullying complaint
  • Certified Mediation practioner, to address workplace conflict,
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations
  • Special projects, secondments and assignments

Why does a positive emotional climate lead to creativity and innovation?

A positive team vibe is essential for team success

A positive team vibe is essential for team success

A positive team vibe or emotional climate* is essential for team success. Perhaps you haven’t thought about this? But it is a characteristic of high performing teams.

A positive, engaging workplace provides psychological safety and helps develop team commitment. It helps people to speak up and collaborate and take risks together. The result: a team works well together. Other people also notice and are attracted by the warm atmosphere. A positive team vibe makes for popularity.

Teams create their emotional climate through a shared history, their work context and members’ characteristics.

Surprisingly, almost every team, even those in highly regulated call centres (as in our research study*) are creative to some degree. Opportunities for creativity, for example, open up when dealing with uncertain customer problems and inquiries.

Often such complex customer interactions are satisfied best when the team involved collaborates. Successful teams lay the groundwork for responding to such uncertainty by their use of positive emotions such as joy, gratitude, serenity, interest, hope, pride, amusement, inspiration, awe and love (see my previous blog post for more information about these http://ow.ly/Lv6GQ ).

Positive emotions help us open up and also make us receptive to new ideas and experiences. They encourage our interest in connecting with other people and provide us with the resources to strengthen personal resilience. A positive team climate raises productivity.

Here are five actions you can take to build a positive emotional climate in your team:

  1. Use positive emotions consciously to help develop the feeling that people are a part of their team and their organisation
  2. Make it safe for people to speak up and influence decision making
  3. Show clearly that people are treated evenly
  4. Provide opportunities for people to learn and master new skills – and to share these with other team members
  5. Address interpersonal conflicts, and conflict between different teams

*Peralta, C.F. et al. (2015) Innovation processes and team effectiveness: The role of goal clarity and commitment, and team affective tone, Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, vol 88, part 1, March

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499

E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people.

Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Special projects, secondments and assignments
  • Mediation, to address workplace conflict
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level

Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations

Photo by stockimages. Published on 19 January 2014

Three Ways to Show You Appreciate Your Colleagues this Christmas

Being appreciated is a motivational experience

Being appreciated is a motivational experience

Being appreciated makes working together a positive experience

Taking the opportunity to encourage your team, deepen bonds and appreciate one another is a positive aspect of Christmas. It provides us with a moment in dark mid-winter to consider those we work with.

Take my colleague Ed, for example. Ed’s strength is his enthusiasm. He gets excited about ideas and people. He is always passionate, interested and positive about what the team does. A few months ago we were given some work most of us thought was boring. Not Ed though. He had us seeing the importance of the work, and his enthusiasm helped everyone do a great job. What would we do without him? Has anyone told Ed this, specifically? Probably not. Yet it would certainly show appreciation to do so.

So, here are three steps your team could take, ideally in a team get-together, to show appreciation. However, if you can’t be together then you could use email, cards or even calls instead.

  1. Each person takes a moment to think about each team member and note a valuable strength each person has and how it would feel to be in the team without that strength. There are many strengths to choose from. For example, you may have colleagues who have good ideas or who communicate well, who are dependable or who know their own mind. There are colleagues who are the life and soul of the team, who bring a splash of colour and original thinking to the team, who can sell an idea or who are excellent with detail. There are also people who develop solutions or are well organised, or are loyal and, so on. You should have a list of colleagues linked to their valuable strengths.
  2. Now each person should think of a time when he or she saw each person use their particular strength. What was it that made you smile and appreciate that person?
  3. And now each team member should take it in turns to share their appreciation of each other’s strengths and what makes them smile when they see these strengths being used.

If you can’t all be together, or someone is missing or you feel that people would appreciate a less public approach, then consider an email, a card or a call. Being appreciated makes working together a positive experience.

ID-100167019

If you can’t show appreciation face to face then consider an email, a card or a call

Enjoy Christmas by showing appreciation for your colleagues.

Have a Merry Christmas.

 

 

 

 

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499

E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people.

Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Team development and team building
  • Support if you are being bullied, or have a member of your organisation who has made a bullying complaint
  • Mediation, to address workplace conflict
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations
  • Special projects, secondments and assignments

 

5 Reasons to Use Appreciative Change – Be the Best You Can Be

to be the best by appreciating their strengths

Appreciative Change  leads organisations’s to be the best by appreciating their strengths

Appreciative Inquiry is effective. It helps people hold conversations, dialogues, and tell stories that identify what they are good at. It also makes it easy for people to express the ways in which they work best, including processes, systems, techniques and, knowledge. Appreciative Inquiry has been, and continues to be, successfully used within organisations for specific teams and for coaching individuals.

At a meeting recently a senior business leader said:

“There is something wrong with my people they don’t like change, they don’t get it”

He was frustrated and was continuously trying to sell change to his employees, with no avail. However, during our conversation we talked about ‘Appreciative Inquiry’ and he accepted that his assumptions almost guaranteed resistance.

He asked me what may work instead. For me, collaboration and crafting the way forward with those who will be most affected has always proven to be effective, owing to:

  1. Co-creation and crafting the future: uses the knowledge and experience of people who are likely to have the greatest impact. They test out the thinking with one another and typically create even better solutions.
  2. Participation: actively self generates energy, enthusiasm and commitment. People ‘get it’ as they understand the context and need for something to happen rather than be told to change. Implementation quickly follows.
  3. Involvement of people: to design and refine the detail. This develops deeper commitment and people begin to spontaneously share progress and invite others to help refine the design.
  4. Strengths of people, systems and processes: are harnessed and people shine a light on what the organisation, teams and individuals do best.
  5. Problems are replaced by innovation as conversations increasingly shift toward uncovering the organisation’s (or team’s/community’s) positive core.

So why don’t all organisations work this way? Appreciative Inquiry requires leaders and their organisations to demonstrate a different style of leadership. They need to ‘let go a little more’ as a leader once said to me, and “become focussed and genuinely interested in helping the organisation to be the best by appreciating their strengths”. She saw her job as “generating hope and helping my people to travel hopefully and optimistically’. It was great to see her people do just that.

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499

E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people.

Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Special projects, secondments and assignments
  • Mediation, to address workplace conflict
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations

10 Good Habits to Generate Dialogue and Save Time

Good dialogue saves time. Make sure you do it well

Good dialogue saves time. Make sure you do it well

Communication is a major task for everyone at work.Therefore, doing it well matters.

 

Communicate in a way that uses time wisely. Here are 10 top tips for doing just that:

 

 

  1. Focus on the person you are talking to
  2. Maintain eye contact, listen to them
  3. React positively, and professionally, if news is bad. Bad news is valuable – don’t behave in a way that will ensure you are the last person it hear it
  4. Contribute to a positive and creative team environment where you are trusted you to listen appreciatively to one another’s ideas
  5. Provide time for people  who speaks slowly, or is perhaps a reflective thinker
  6. Help others stay on topic by gently bringing them back to it
  7. Pay attention to key thoughts, build on them
  8. Jot down important points and facts, especially dates, figures and names
  9. If you need to take action based on a conversation takes notes
  10. Try to listen to the person you are conversing without planning what you will say next.

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499

E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people.

Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Special projects, secondments and assignments
  • Mediation, to address workplace conflict
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations