1 way to identify a narcissist – ask them!

“If you suspect someone in your life is a narcissist, there may be an incredibly straightforward way to confirm your suspicions: Just ask them” says Melissa Dahl: The Narcissist Test. Dahl makes this claim based on a new book: The Narcissist Test: How to spot outsized egos … and the surprising things we can learn from them by Craig Malkin (2015, Harper Collins).

For a quick summary about recognising a narcissist, please have a look at the blog I published a couple of years ago:

A narcissist can charm the birds – and recruiters – out of the trees, so don't interview alone

A narcissist can charm the birds, be a charming devil, and be destructive and unpleasant to work with

Charming the birds off the trees

Charming the birds off the trees, or a charming devil?

‘I start off as a witch, and then get a bit nicer – sometimes’

When does confidence, easy charm and the ability to persuade people to your way of thinking move towards a darker, unhealthy part of personality. More often than you may think, since research in the USA indicates that executive failure owing to personality traits costs $3m annually. Given the relative seniority of such people, these costs may be the tip of the iceberg.

Often people who are charming are successful in organisations. However, organisations are often inept at noticing those with a darkside to charm: narcissism.

Narcissists are unpleasant and destructive to work with, or for. They are self absorbed, have vaulting ambition with inflated and at times, unrealistic opinions about themselves, particularly in relation to others. Examples I have heard are “I can make a profit anywhere”, “I start off as a witch, and then get a bit nicer, sometimes”, “I have made a mistake accepting this new job, it is not big enough for me”. Even just three statements show their sense of entitlement and exemption from standards and norms. In gaining entitlement they can be vicious, deliberately sabotage careers of others, and are good at managing their managers. Significantly, they feel no remorse. Equally, they can be charismatic, dramatic and exciting.

So, if your recruitment and performance management systems can’t tell the difference between someone who can healthily ‘charm the birds off the trees’ and someone who is an unhealthy ‘charming devil’ take heed! It’s simply not true that devilish individuals won’t rise to important positions. There is evidence that some well known and initially respected business leaders, sports people, politicians and religious leaders have narcissist personality traits.

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

T: 07779 345 499

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people.

Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Certified ACT practioner
  • Support if you are being bullied, or have a member of your organisation who has made a bullying complaint
  • Certified Mediation practioner, to address workplace conflict,
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations
  • Special projects, secondments and assignments

Three ways to help team members commit support to each other

Commit to helping each another will develop your team spirit.

teams who commit to helping each other lift their team performance

Teams who commit to helping each other lift their team performance

Have a team voice: involve your team in issues that affect them, give them their voice and listen to what they say. Help team colleagues to identify when and who may need help. Then support and show gratitude to each other when help is received.

Stretching team goals provide a unifying focal point

Stretching team goals provide a unifying focal point

 

 

Make the team mean something: have stretching team goals that have a purpose, are clear and also compelling in order to be a unifying focal point. Talk about your team goals when you are together. Put team goals into the limelight so they mobilise your team spirit. Goals need clear finish lines, so you all know when they have been achieved.

 

Pride (2)Celebrate the big and little wins: This can be as simple as a thank you and well done. It’s about taking a moment, all together, to enjoy and learn together about what works well for you as a team – see previous blog about appreciation.

 

Building an effective team happens through leadership and team involvement. It is supported with authentic gratitude and a shared team vision.

This is the third blog about how to help your team to be the best it can and be successful. The principles below can deepen team bonds when implemented well and greatly improve team performance.

Principles:

  • Observe confidentiality
  • Appreciate statements that each team member makes
  • Commit to helping each other
  • Give everyone a chance to speak and support each person’s contribution

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499

E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people.

Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Certified ACT practioner
  • Support if you are being bullied, or have a member of your organisation who has made a bullying complaint
  • Certified Mediation practioner, to address workplace conflict,
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations
  • Special projects, secondments and assignments

Appreciation goes a very long way indeed in team-building

Appreciation is an often neglected aspect of building effectiveness

Appreciation is an often neglected aspect of building effectiveness

In my last blog post I introduced you to the principles that promote a safe team environment:

  • Observe confidentiality
  • Appreciate statements that each team member makes
  • Commit to helping each other
  • Give everyone a chance to speak – and support each person’s contribution

I talked about principle one: confidentiality [Nhttp://mwrconsulting.co.uk/?p=9652] now I am going to look at principle two: appreciation.

Why?

It is an often neglected aspect of building effectiveness. What a shame. Appreciation conveys a recognition of both the team and its individual members. Here are three ‘appreciative’ tips to help you appreciate each other:

  1. Say ‘thank you’ to one another for doing good work; for sharing information, and for giving and receiving help. Such appreciation also builds the foundation for being appreciated in return.
  2. Agree with your team colleagues that you will validate and appreciate each other’s statements, whether or not you agree with them. This can be done by saying, “Yes, and…

Let’s take a closer look at the “Yes, and…” approach.

Jack, a member of your team, recommends to you all that a team charter that covers the social aspects of team effectiveness would help the team a lot. The first response comes from Evie, who says, Yes, and then we can use it with new team members and when people are seconded to help us.”

It works because ‘yes’ accepts and appreciates the contribution made, and this enables deeper collaboration.

And the “and…” adds to the acceptance and appreciation shown by encouraging new information to be added. Hence the expression: yes and 1Pro

  1. The team can also express appreciation and provide challenging questions that develop ideas by responding with:

yes and 1Pro …that sounds interesting…

Or, “that makes me think….” Before offering their own contribution.

These three appreciative tips work well to create a space where everyone can be heard.

Photo by Ambro

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499

E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people.

Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Certified ACT practioner
  • Support if you are being bullied, or have a member of your organisation who has made a bullying complaint
  • Certified Mediation practioner, to address workplace conflict,
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations
  • Special projects, secondments and assignments

Three ways to build a team using confidentiality and information-sharing

You can help your team to be the best it can and be successful.

Involve as many of your people as we practically can.

Build a successful team – use 4 principles to create a psychologically safe team environment

The principles below can deepen team bonds when implemented well and greatly improve team performance.

4 Principles that build a psychologically safe team environment:

  • Observe confidentiality
  • Appreciate statements that each team member makes
  • Commit to helping each other
  • Give everyone a chance to speak and support each person’s contribution
Breaches of team confidentiality breaks trust - potentially beyond repair

Breaches of team confidentiality breaks trust – potentially beyond repair

Once in place, these principles help create a safe work environment. In this blog post I am going to take a closer look at confidentiality. Why? Well it’s easy to take confidentiality for granted. But such complacency leads to gaffes and the kind of confidentiality breaches that can damage trust beyond repair. Experience shows that being clear about confidentiality helps team members realise just how important it is.

There are three steps involved in securing and building confidentiality:

  1. Clarity – be clear about what can and can’t be shared

From the outset, your team should agree to keep the content team dialogues confidential.

  1. Realism – be realistic about the sharing of learning

It makes sense to define and agree on what can be shared outside of team dialogues. A positive approach to this is to treat team dialogues as a learning opportunity. This encourages team members to use what they have learnt. In this way, the team builds the supportive conditions necessary for knowledge sharing.

It’s also important to agree on what should not be shared with those not on the team. Team members need to be clear about why certain information can’t be shared so everyone understands the implications. Specifically, information sharing shouldn’t include verbatim reports of who said what (good or bad) nor elaborate examples of conflict, or moments that may have been difficult and distressing for the team.

  1. Purpose – of confidentiality

Confidentiality, when clarified, works because valuable insights from information sharing build team knowledge. This is important since information sharing has been consistently shown to enhance team effectiveness and productivity, and, hence, performance.

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499

E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people.

Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Certified ACT practioner
  • Support if you are being bullied, or have a member of your organisation who has made a bullying complaint
  • Certified Mediation practioner, to address workplace conflict,
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations
  • Special projects, secondments and assignments

How to change a negative first impression

Negative first impressions stick – unless you take action

Negative first impressions stick – unless you take action

Embarrassment is high when you ‘put your foot in it’ and gaffe socially with someone you have just met. Perhaps you forgot their name having been just introduced. Do you feel this will leave a lasting negative impression?

You can put things right. Recent research**shows that an initial negative impression and judgement can be changed. However, the researchers found that this needed a positive and active rethink of deeply held initial negative emotions and judgments. Participants on the receiving end had to concentrate with no distraction. Then they were able to reinterpret a gaffe and consider the motives of the other person. In so doing, they often achieved a positive shift that reversed their initial impression.

1 thing you can do if you gaffe:

If you yourself have – ‘put your foot in it‘ and, gaffed – then be honest. You may say something like “I was really nervous about meeting you…” or “you caught me at a bad time…”. Most people will relate to your honesty.

1 thing you can do for the person who gaffes:

The next time someone ’puts their foot in it’ with you consider what other possibilities may lie beneath their behaviour. The research showed the importance of understanding motives and addressing a social gaffe. Was the person really nervous or very shy? Was the person who slammed past you in the car park rushing to an ill relative?

*Mann, T., & Ferguson, M. (2015). Can We Undo Our First Impressions? The Role of Reinterpretation in Reversing Implicit Evaluations. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology DOI:10.1037/pspa0000021

Photo by imagerymajestic. Image ID: 100107472

 

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499

E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people.

Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Certified ACT practioner
  • Support if you are being bullied, or have a member of your organisation who has made a bullying complaint
  • Certified Mediation practioner, to address workplace conflict,
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations
  • Special projects, secondments and assignments

 

Why did people tell pollsters one answer yet vote differently on May 7th?

Did you vote?

Did you change how you would vote when you marked the paper?

We just don’t notice that what we say and what we do often conflict.

Our innermost thoughts are something we tend to regard as correct, true, and trustworthy. Importantly these thoughts guide what we will do – or we think that they do.

Polling predictions did not reflect the 2015 election result. Did your voting 2015 election decision throw your certainties into doubt when you marked the voting paper?

Moments sometimes happen when we notice that our inner thoughts and plans are not what we actually do. We surprise ourselves.

Usually however, we just don’t notice that what we say and what we do often conflict. This means that we don’t really know what affects our decisions and behaviour.

Nobel Prize winning research from Daniel Khaneman has shown that the kinds of things we take in into account when we make decisions are often not things we say are involved. So, when asked how we will vote we can say one thing to a pollster and then vote differently on the day itself.

As the pollsters go and lick their wounds it is worth remembering that they already knew that ‘what we say’ and ‘what we do’ can be very different…

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499

E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people.

Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Certified ACT practioner
  • Support if you are being bullied, or have a member of your organisation who has made a bullying complaint
  • Certified Mediation practioner, to address workplace conflict,
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations
  • Special projects, secondments and assignments

7 ways to clear team goals

Have clear team goals, goals that are clear as mud hold teams back

Have clear team goals and a positive team vibe to have both creativity and innovation, gin your team

Goals that are clear as mud hold teams back – here’s how to develop clear team goals

When a team has clear goals and enjoys a positive emotional vibe this will drive both creativity and innovation.*

But if goals are clear as mud, your team will definitely be held back from becoming the best it could.

Goal clarity builds motivation to be creative and innovative, and to take calculated risks.

Goal clarity also encourages teams to collaborate and pull together to achieve success. Even in tough times, clear goals can build certainty and help teams stay on track. They can then achieve high levels of productivity. Goal clarity and a positive emotional vibe are the foundations for high and consistent team performance.

7 ways to achieve goal clarity and flourish – and secure high team performance:

  1. Involve team members in developing, clarifying and prioritising team goals before undertaking any creative or innovative activity
  2. Build a positive emotional climate (see previous blog post [Positive Emotional Climate])
  3. Encourage team members to drive changes in their work processes
  4. Use team-building to get new team members, or new teams, established quickly with clear goals
  5. Explore and develop team values, and explore how the team will work together
  6. Provide coaching to help individual team members be flexible and develop a commitment to team goals
  7. Resolve interpersonal conflict and conflict between teams to create a positive team vibe

A positive emotional climate with clarity around team goals helps creativity and innovation become the norm and enables – and sustains – high levels of team productivity.

* Peralta, C.F. et al. (2015) Innovation processes and team effectiveness: The role of goal clarity and commitment, and team-affective tone, Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, vol 88, part 1, March

 

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499

E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people.

Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Certified ACT practioner
  • Support if you are being bullied, or have a member of your organisation who has made a bullying complaint
  • Certified Mediation practioner, to address workplace conflict,
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations
  • Special projects, secondments and assignments

Why does a positive emotional climate lead to creativity and innovation?

A positive team vibe is essential for team success

A positive team vibe is essential for team success

A positive team vibe or emotional climate* is essential for team success. Perhaps you haven’t thought about this? But it is a characteristic of high performing teams.

A positive, engaging workplace provides psychological safety and helps develop team commitment. It helps people to speak up and collaborate and take risks together. The result: a team works well together. Other people also notice and are attracted by the warm atmosphere. A positive team vibe makes for popularity.

Teams create their emotional climate through a shared history, their work context and members’ characteristics.

Surprisingly, almost every team, even those in highly regulated call centres (as in our research study*) are creative to some degree. Opportunities for creativity, for example, open up when dealing with uncertain customer problems and inquiries.

Often such complex customer interactions are satisfied best when the team involved collaborates. Successful teams lay the groundwork for responding to such uncertainty by their use of positive emotions such as joy, gratitude, serenity, interest, hope, pride, amusement, inspiration, awe and love (see my previous blog post for more information about these http://ow.ly/Lv6GQ ).

Positive emotions help us open up and also make us receptive to new ideas and experiences. They encourage our interest in connecting with other people and provide us with the resources to strengthen personal resilience. A positive team climate raises productivity.

Here are five actions you can take to build a positive emotional climate in your team:

  1. Use positive emotions consciously to help develop the feeling that people are a part of their team and their organisation
  2. Make it safe for people to speak up and influence decision making
  3. Show clearly that people are treated evenly
  4. Provide opportunities for people to learn and master new skills – and to share these with other team members
  5. Address interpersonal conflicts, and conflict between different teams

*Peralta, C.F. et al. (2015) Innovation processes and team effectiveness: The role of goal clarity and commitment, and team affective tone, Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, vol 88, part 1, March

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499

E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people.

Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Special projects, secondments and assignments
  • Mediation, to address workplace conflict
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level

Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations

Photo by stockimages. Published on 19 January 2014

4 ways to wisely balance work and home – avoid Smartphone overuse

“Do you have to use your Smartphone 24x7, you’re always working...?”

“Do you have to use your Smartphone 24×7, you’re always working…?”

“Do you have to use your Smartphone 24×7, you’re always working…?”…does this sound familiar? If so, then this blog is certainly one for you!

Think about today, have you experienced work-home interference from overusing your Smartphone? To ensure a happy lifestyle, we must ensure that we get this home life, work life balance right….and in many cases overusing our Smartphone’s can work to blur these lines.

In many cases this line blurring occurs when employers suggest their people should be available almost all of the time. This means many people stick glued to their mobiles phones to ensure they remain reachable…

But, don’t just take my work for it. Recent research has found that:

  • People who felt highly engaged at work tended to find effective ways to detach home from work
  • People who thought that their supervisor expected them to be highly available suffered high levels of home-work interference. Also, this tended to be a negative imbalance when experienced via their Smartphone off-duty at home
  • People who didn’t think that their supervisor expected them to be highly available suffered lower levels of home-work interference
  • High levels of work-home interference elevated stress, and lead to;
  • Deterioration of performance and reduction in life satisfaction.

So, how do we work to separate our home and work lives to ensure a happy balance? Well, here are 4 tips that should help:

  1. Supervisors by modelling good practice with their Smartphone, both at work and at home, demonstrate clear expectations and provide permission for their team to follow suit
  2. Supervisors should take care when they respond to work messages during leisure time, as they may inadvertently build expectations about constantly being available
  3. Organisations should positively engage with employees in order to reduce the impact of Smartphone use, and to positively set the scene for overt team agreement
  4. Supervisors are recommended to support team members by linking team values and expectations about Smartphone use with an agreement on team collaboration. This is often constructively done during a team review of what they do well when working together so they can do more of it.

So, put down your Smartphone and try and draw a line between your work and home life. You’ll thank me in the long run!

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499

E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people.

Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Certified ACT practioner
  • Support if you are being bullied, or have a member of your organisation who has made a bullying complaint
  • Certified Mediation practioner, to address workplace conflict,
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations
  • Special projects, secondments and assignments

How to bounce back from hard times

You can improve your resilience, making you more capable of dealing with setbacks

Pride (2)

Positive feelings, such as joy, interest and pride, are pleasant to experience

Positive emotions build resilience to setbacks, improve relationships and help to us be healthy.

Positive emotions build resilience to setbacks, improve relationships and help to us be healthy. We know this from a wealth of psychological research.

Positive feelings, such as joy, interest and pride, are pleasant to experience. Our bodies relax and our heart-rate lowers. When we are in a positive emotional mind-set we sit up and smile, and we want to share the associated positive experience. We open up to other people, adopt a wider point-of-view and feel more like participating than when a negative emotional mindset is in play.

On the other hand, negative emotions, such as anger, fear and anxiety, make our bodies tense up. We tighten our jaw and our heart-rate increases. We pull inwards, close down and narrow our point-of-view. Often memories associated with these feelings turn into mental videos that are difficult to halt. Have you noticed that the positive emotions are also more subtle and quieter than negatives ones?

Negative emotions pack an intense emotional punch as they are hard-wired into us as protection from hard knocks and danger. This means a high number of positive moments is needed to offset the negative mindset that results from just one negative moment.

So, negativity is characterised by intense impact, and positivity the need for frequent such experiences. This difference in how we experience positive and negative emotions means we perceive negative emotions strongly, resulting in a natural bias towards negativity. Even so, a high volume of positive emotions can offset this bias.

Positive emotions offset negativity as they create resources within us that we can draw upon in more challenging times. A positive mindset generates resilience, improves relationships and helps us to be healthy. This means that work becomes more manageable and we have more energy available. This, in turn, helps us to control and adjust to the impact the world has on us.

Both positive and negative emotions have their place; they make us human. However, positive emotions need attention if we are to readily benefit from them.

The positive emotions, all 10 of them, are listed in the table below:

Lookout for and savour positive emotions to build resilience

Lookout for and savour positive emotions to build resilience

Explore positive feelings and emotions with the aid of these two tips:

  1. Keep a list of positive experiences. Perhaps note them down on the way home from work or shopping, or over a bedtime drink at the end of the day. I bet you’ll be surprised at just how many there are.
  2. Revisit them in the morning to energise your day, savour them and enjoy them. In a year’s time look back at them again.

 

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

T: 07779 345 499

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people.

Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Certified ACT practioner
  • Support if you are being bullied, or have a member of your organisation who has made a bullying complaint
  • Certified Mediation practioner, to address workplace conflict,
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations
  • Special projects, secondments and assignments