Do you know what your values are and is your life guided by them?

CT aligns individual and team values with organisational goals

CT aligns individual and team values with organisational goals

When we are guided by values our life is easier.

Do you know what your values are and is your life guided by them?

Values are an important guide on your journey through life. They guide your direction, and your behaviour stems from them. When we are guided by values our life is easier. And when we are in conflict with them we feel upset, frustrated and perhaps even angry.

What are values?

Values are what you want to stand for deep in your heart*. Answering these questions will help you discover what yours are:

  • What do you want your life to be about?
  • What sort of things do you most want to do?
  • What type of person do you most want to be?
  • How do you want to be in your relationships with others?
  • What would you like to be remembered for by the people you love?

How do values work?

A value is like a lighthouse seen in the distance. It guides you through your journey in life, in good times as well as in challenging and difficult times.

Why are they important?

Values help you to pursue what matters to you; they aren’t goals. Rather, they are the personal choices you make about the direction of your life. (They are not about what you should, must or have to do.) Clarity about your values also gives you pointers to your goals and the actions that will help you move in your chosen direction. Values bring vitality and a sense of purpose to life.

Having clarity about your values means that you know where you are going and don’t have to keep checking you are on course. However, having clear values doesn’t ensure a straight path through life. Often you may need to change direction to get back to your values.

Values are usually stable, yet may change over time to reflect your achievements. Noticing your values change in this way represents small steps taken regarding the overall direction you have chosen. So, it’s important to stay in touch with your values, so as to support your ‘valued’ direction.

What values aren’t

Goals are way-markers along your chosen path. They can be achieved. You can tick them off and identify what you have achieved. Values, however, are behaviours we believe are important. So, you can’t achieve a value; rather you live using your values as a guide.

Individuals and teams who identify their values reap many benefits:

  • Individuals who understand their values gain insight into the behaviours that support them. This includes, for example, how they may vote, make consumer choices or choose an occupation.
  • Behaviours that are consistent with values help keep us going in our chosen direction. And behaving consistently builds trust.
  • Behaviours aligned to values develop individuals’ well-being

 Exercises to help people understand their values

  1. How to help individuals identify their values

Jump ahead to your 80th birthday party. All your friends and family, colleagues, and loved ones are there. It’s a good turn-out – imagine that all the people you have ever cared about are able to attend. Now the cake arrives. After you blow out your 80 candles everyone takes turns to talk about your personal qualities and key strengths.

Your task is this: what three things you would most want these people to say about the kind of person you have been in life? Choose whatever you want them to say about your personal qualities and key strengths. And remember: it’s your imaginary party, so please feel free to highlight what you would really want to hear people say about you on your Big Day.

  1. How to help a team identify and share their values

Before working with a team check that everyone agrees to share their top three values with each other. Start by using the exercise above, so everyone has a chance to identify their own values. Now, pair everyone up. Each partner then gets a turn at introducing the other partner – name and what job they do – and then tells everyone what the three things are that their partner would most want people to say at their 80th birthday party.

What do values look like when they have been identified?

The example below comes from an ACT coaching session with Eva. Eva is a project manager with a large UK insurance company. Her top three values are:

  • Being a loving and caring wife and mother
  • Being healthy, mentally and physically
  • Being a valued team member

* Adapted from: Harris, R (2008)The Happiness Trap (Based on ACT: A revolutionary mindfulness-based programme for overcoming stress, anxiety and depression), Robinson

Russ is very generous with materials. You can find some more here: http://www.actmindfully.com.au/

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499

E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people.

Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Certified ACT practioner
  • Support if you are being bullied, or have a member of your organisation who has made a bullying complaint
  • Certified Mediation practioner, to address workplace conflict,
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations
  • Special projects, secondments and assignments

 

Isn’t the soup noisy today? 4 Social Media manners that matter

don't slurp your soup

Take Social Media manners seriously and showing respect for your colleagues

You wouldn’t deliberately slurp soup at your desk would you? No, of course not.

You wouldn’t want the wrath of your colleagues to descend upon you for disrupting them. Also, most of us respect and consider the colleagues that we work beside and we all know that disruption of work causes conflicts and negative feelings.

Yet, when it comes to Social Media it’s amazing how often people break such understandings and subsequently disrupt others. However, by taking Social Media manners seriously and showing respect for your colleagues will allow you to go a long way in helping to develop a good working community. Here are four such manners that will help:

1. Encourage your colleagues to agree how and when you can all use personal social media at work. This helps to avoid recrimination and keeps personal social media activity within boundaries that meet both your supervisor and team colleagues expectations

2. Put your personal and organisation phone on silent in the office. Apart from happily missing out on each others calls, colleagues probably also would appreciate not sharing ring tones, bleeps and a shuddering /vibrating desk. Especially the vibrating desk, that tends to really press neighbours’ hot buttons.

3. When talking to a colleague don’t glance at your phone. It is annoying and disrespectful. However, if you need to check information related to the conversation, or if you are waiting for an urgent email then let them know. People don’t mind then. However, be warned, don’t abuse this social convention.

4. When you are in client meetings put phones into flight mode. Also, use your out of office message to manage incoming messenger expectations. In long meetings use breaks to check your email.

Trigger Happy TV and Dom Jolly’s socially unacceptable giant Nokia hit this awkward nail right on the head! You wouldn’t shout on your phone in the silent section of the library…so give your colleagues the same treatment. In short, your social media habits can be annoying. So please stop slurping your social media soup and let others work in peace.

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499 E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people. Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Special projects, secondments and assignments
  • Mediation, to address workplace conflict
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations

How do you engage your people during organisational change?

New approaches to mentoring means it is not old hat

Mentoring is certainly not old hat

I’m asked quite often whether mentoring really works as a way to engage people during organisational change.

My answer goes something like this:

  • Research shows that organizations who establish a mentoring programme will see a significant effect on levels of employee engagement.
  • However, employee engagement during times of change is important. It builds understanding. It builds commitment. As a result, people see their organization positively and they will ‘go the extra mile ‘.
  • The old hat model of ‘mentoring for high-flyers’ is overturned by being most effective with the bottom 20% of performers.
  • Mentoring delivers higher levels of engagement and is valuable.

These days mentoring is a much broader approach.  Rather refreshingly it now applies to everyone.

Mentoring is for everyone

Mentoring is for everyone, it builds skill and confidence

Mentoring is especially useful in virtual teams, project teams and during organisational change. Nowadays mentoring is about learning and advising. When carried out in this way it raises levels of knowledge and skill, builds competencies and develops confidence.

If you need to introduce a change to how people work, then consider using mentoring to help people engage in the change and sustain it in future.

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499

E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people.

Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Special projects, secondments and assignments
  • Mediation, to address workplace conflict
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations

‘Competency framework’ – tool for performance appraisal

 

'Competency frameworks' can provide the language needed to tackle performance management

‘Competency frameworks’ can provide the language needed to tackle performance management

‘Competency frameworks’ can provide managers with both a framework and the language needed to tackle the complex task of performance management.

They can do so in three ways:

  • by defining each competency
  • by breaking down each competency into levels of performance through which people can progress
  • by providing behavioural indicators – through the use of examples – to show what both desired and derailing behaviours look like.

The table below shows how competencies at various levels – from basic to management level – are expressed. Each competency in the table has a definition, and the different levels of performance include: behaviour, knowledge, skills, abilities, attributes and attitudes.

Table to show an example of how a coaching competency may look in an insurance industry management role – a Call Centre Manager

competancy table

Often six performance levels are indicated in such tables – from zero, which is not relevant, to five, which indicates mastery. Incidentally, the requirements at level five also include those from levels one to four. The ‘coaching competency’ table above is for an insurance industry contact centre manager role. Identifying, and then defining, all the needed competencies and then putting them into such a framework means the relevant ones can be assigned to each role (typically, these will be six to eight per role). The required level of performance is also highlighted.

A competency framework such as this can provide an organisation with both a very useful tool and the language needed for good performance management. Language can be customised by leaders to ensure it is individually focused and relevant to the team, and aligned to the organisation’s goals.

Our next blog post will explain the contribution ‘competencies’ can make to developing trust, and how trust can ignite both individual and team engagement.

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499

E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people.

 

Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Special projects, secondments and assignments
  • Mediation, to address workplace conflict
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations

 

Energise your organisation using ‘competencies’

A ‘competencies’ framework can be used to manage performance and link individual performance to organisational goals.

Illustration of a Competency Framework

Illustration of a Competency Framework

Competency is critical to individual, the team and the organisation’s performance.

Competency links individual performance to organisational goals. And when competency-based performance management is carried out well it engages people. Since competency is so important – and useful – this will be the first of five blog posts that look at various aspects of developing and using ‘competencies’ that tend to be overlooked, or tend to become diluted over time.

Managing competency starts with a framework that includes all the organisation’s roles and at all levels. Typically, six to eight such ‘competencies’ relate to business and people management, and another six to eight relate to technical skills. In large organisations there may be specific frameworks that reflect job families and distinguish between team member competencies and management ones, particularly senior management competencies.

Competencies explain – and show – how important elements, knowledge, skills, abilities, attributes and attitudes, impact specifically on each role. Like an iceberg, not all of these elements are visible – see diagram below.

Not all the important elements needed to be competent are obvious

Not all the important elements needed to be competent are obvious

However, the important elements can become visible in two ways:

  1. when identified for each role, through dialogue with those with similar roles
  2. when they become visible during performance management assessment and dialogue with the individuals concerned.

The next blog post takes a look at how competencies are expressed.

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499

E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people.

Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Special projects, secondments and assignments
  • Mediation, to address workplace conflict
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations