‘Competency framework’ – tool for performance appraisal

 

'Competency frameworks' can provide the language needed to tackle performance management

‘Competency frameworks’ can provide the language needed to tackle performance management

‘Competency frameworks’ can provide managers with both a framework and the language needed to tackle the complex task of performance management.

They can do so in three ways:

  • by defining each competency
  • by breaking down each competency into levels of performance through which people can progress
  • by providing behavioural indicators – through the use of examples – to show what both desired and derailing behaviours look like.

The table below shows how competencies at various levels – from basic to management level – are expressed. Each competency in the table has a definition, and the different levels of performance include: behaviour, knowledge, skills, abilities, attributes and attitudes.

Table to show an example of how a coaching competency may look in an insurance industry management role – a Call Centre Manager

competancy table

Often six performance levels are indicated in such tables – from zero, which is not relevant, to five, which indicates mastery. Incidentally, the requirements at level five also include those from levels one to four. The ‘coaching competency’ table above is for an insurance industry contact centre manager role. Identifying, and then defining, all the needed competencies and then putting them into such a framework means the relevant ones can be assigned to each role (typically, these will be six to eight per role). The required level of performance is also highlighted.

A competency framework such as this can provide an organisation with both a very useful tool and the language needed for good performance management. Language can be customised by leaders to ensure it is individually focused and relevant to the team, and aligned to the organisation’s goals.

Our next blog post will explain the contribution ‘competencies’ can make to developing trust, and how trust can ignite both individual and team engagement.

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499

E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people.

 

Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Special projects, secondments and assignments
  • Mediation, to address workplace conflict
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations

 

Energise your organisation using ‘competencies’

A ‘competencies’ framework can be used to manage performance and link individual performance to organisational goals.

Illustration of a Competency Framework

Illustration of a Competency Framework

Competency is critical to individual, the team and the organisation’s performance.

Competency links individual performance to organisational goals. And when competency-based performance management is carried out well it engages people. Since competency is so important – and useful – this will be the first of five blog posts that look at various aspects of developing and using ‘competencies’ that tend to be overlooked, or tend to become diluted over time.

Managing competency starts with a framework that includes all the organisation’s roles and at all levels. Typically, six to eight such ‘competencies’ relate to business and people management, and another six to eight relate to technical skills. In large organisations there may be specific frameworks that reflect job families and distinguish between team member competencies and management ones, particularly senior management competencies.

Competencies explain – and show – how important elements, knowledge, skills, abilities, attributes and attitudes, impact specifically on each role. Like an iceberg, not all of these elements are visible – see diagram below.

Not all the important elements needed to be competent are obvious

Not all the important elements needed to be competent are obvious

However, the important elements can become visible in two ways:

  1. when identified for each role, through dialogue with those with similar roles
  2. when they become visible during performance management assessment and dialogue with the individuals concerned.

The next blog post takes a look at how competencies are expressed.

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499

E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people.

Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Special projects, secondments and assignments
  • Mediation, to address workplace conflict
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations

 

 

 

 

Coaching: a powerful way to develop people

Image

Coaching helped Emma to take a step back and consider what ‘walking in the shoes of others felt like’

Coaching helped Emma to take a step back and consider what ‘walking in the shoes of others felt like’

Emma, a newly minted graduate, was writing and producing her first professional play for an arts festival. It was proving a challenge – there were an awful lot of ‘firsts’. Coaching helped Emma deal with these

There was a lot for Emma to do. She was not only writing the play but was organising sponsorship, to briefing the media. In addition, she was managing people for the first time. She found this wasn’t always straightforward – and she had no training or experience to fall back on. Emma identified her top three challenges as follows:

  • Getting people with poor time management skills to deliver on time
  • Setting priorities and establishing a plan that was proportional to what needed to happen
  • Keeping relationships in good shape while under pressure

What Emma learnt

As the coaching dialogue developed, Emma realised that under pressure to deliver she was over-using some team members. Coaching helped Emma to take a step back and consider what ‘walking in the shoes of others felt like’.

Her coach then used of predominantly ‘how would you’ questions to prepare her future interactions. For instance, one puzzle was how to adapt to and collaborate with some people. This proved to be about having the confidence to nurture people while under considerable personal pressure to keep relationships intact. However, deepening relationships is one of Emma’s strengths.

POST SCRIPT: Emma’s play made a profit and got great media reviews.

 Emma says…

 “What was really great for me was walking away feeling motivated – and with a plan. Best of all, I was able to undertake the actions discussed, or was able to adapt them to our ever-changing circumstances.”

Read more here:

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499

E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

We have experience in developing senior managers and their team memebers – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people.

Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Individual and group coaching
  • Mediation, to address workplace conflict, read more here…Mediation how to avoid conflict
  • Personal development activities
  • Special projects, secondments and assignments
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations  Continue reading →

What’s wrong with Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs?

Motivation: “A musician must make music, an artist must paint, a poet must write, if he is to be ultimately at peace with himself.” Abraham Maslow

Motivation: “A musician must make music, an artist must paint, a poet must write, if he is to be ultimately at peace with himself.” Abraham Maslow

Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs (1943) is based on the idea that human motivation is at bottom a bundle of instincts. But this is quite a primeval way of looking at it. It’s as if we were like cats and dogs. It doesn’t recognise the sophistication of how people actually think in terms of motivation and cognition.

It also doesn’t explain heroes or how people are motivated to break through the pain barrier as Olympic athletes do. It doesn’t explain tenacity or perseverance, or heroism. It doesn’t answer this at all.  Nor does it explain why people do voluntary work, or why they do poorly paid jobs when they could get a much better job. It does not explain why people are different in their needs and priorities.

The theory is good in that it introduces people to the idea of how their employees might be thinking about work.

Psychologists and statisticians like Maslow because the theory has “strong face validity”. It’s intuitively a very helpful way of explaining human motivation, and does so rather easily. But there are much better ways of doing so that are just as easy to understand. These other explanations have also been scientifically proven. They show managers how, if used properly, you can improve both people’s motivation and their performance.

The theory is Locke and Latham’s (1984) goal-setting theory. It’s not a very sexy name for a theory compared with Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs, but it really is a very good and helpful theory, and would make the subject of a whole other blog post. So, stay posted…

 

 

 

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