People say they want to work for an organisation with a strong social conscience

Would you prefer to work in a strongly socially conscious organisation?

Would you prefer to work in a strongly socially conscious organisation?

Organisational values around giving something back to society are becoming more important for attracting new people

Organisational values around giving something back to society are becoming more important for attracting new people, especially young people

Desire to work for organisations with a strong social conscience is a rising trend. It may well become one of the future defining factors influencing the attraction and retention of future employees. Many organisations are already winning when it comes to social conscience; just take a look at:  Body Shop, Starbucks, Google, Innocent and Pret a Manager. In a survey, reported by HR Magazine and carried out  PwC1 almost two-thirds of respondents wanted to work for an organisation with a strong social conscience. HR professionals are now building their talent strategies around societal and environmental issues. – See more at HR Magazine. It appears that the more socially conscious an organisation becomes, the greater the demand to work there. What makes this both important and interesting is not just that organisations with a strong social conscience may want to do ‘good’. Just as importantly they need to create and maintain a profitable and sustainable business. This need for business success seems to specifically mitigate appearing unduly ‘soft and fluffy’, sentimental, and therefore, being perceived as an unworkable company. Instead it turns an organisation with strong social conscience into one that’s clear and strong when setting future directions. In so doing, organisations with a strong social conscience may well be more successful in attracting and retaining those employees who are keen to join the workforce. Some questions from this piece:

  • Is having a Social Conscience as an organisation something that only wealthy, ‘corporate’ organisations can aspire to?
  • Why have some organisations with a ‘corporate’ image not been persuaded to step up to the social conscience plate, for example: Amazon, some UK banks?
  • What are the implications for the many employers in the small business sector?

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499 E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people. Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Special projects, secondments and assignments
  • Mediation, to address workplace conflict
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations

 

Do you judge people by their face – as if “judging a book by its cover”

Would you employ this person?

Would you employ this person?

Often we make judgments of others based on their facial features. Mostly, we are not even aware of it. Later, such judgments can appear hasty and ill-considered, downright unfair and wrong. Sometimes of course, we are right. The issue is that we may not know the reasons for being right. However, these sorts of judgments can affect our behaviour. It can be hard to change them, or to stop ourselves from making such judgments in real-time. Recent research by Tom Hartley (see more below) indicates that it’s useful to know how people in general tend to judge others based on first appearances. It may help us to understand how we as individuals may tend to judge others. 

Did she do a good job?

Did she do a good job?

This is particularly important to the world of work where we may make decisions and use judgments that may not be accurate. This may include decisions about important people issues, such as assessing performance, making new investments, recruiting new people or promoting people within the organisation already.

Did you decisions meet your personal and organisation's values?

Do your decisions meet your organisation’s values?

Making unwise decisions is bad enough but making unfair decisions can lead to discrimination, which is not only unfair and wrong, it is unlawful. A good source of support is ACAS . Read the blog from Tom Hartley  If you are interested in understanding what specific triggers can lead to hasty and ill-considered judgments then you can read more here: http://thermaltoy.wordpress.com/2014/07/28/first-impressions-count-but-how/

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499 E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people. Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Special projects, secondments and assignments
  • Mediation, to address workplace conflict
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations

“All people decisions at Google are based on data and analytics”

ATT00037

Does Google believe in creativity, or are they really ‘doing HR’ by numbers?

Creativity and innovation is important, this is what Google says:

“A strategic focus on people management is necessary because innovations come from people, and you simply can’t maximize innovations unless you are capable of recruiting and retaining innovators. And even then, you must provide them with great managers and an environment that supports innovation.” read more from them here: – http://ow.ly/zr4x0

This is an interesting piece, with no doubt a marketing angle. However, perhaps what is important is that Google has implemented their approach well. A challenge for others is can they make this kind of approach contextually workable and do a good implementation job?

 

Some more thoughts about creativity from my blog can be viewed from here:http://mwrconsulting.co.uk/?p=4685  and http://mwrconsulting.co.uk/?p=4292

 

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499

E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people.

 

 

Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Special projects, secondments and assignments
  • Mediation, to address workplace conflict
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations

How to avoid employing a narcissist

A narcissist can charm the birds – and recruiters – out of the trees, so don't interview alone

A narcissist can charm the birds – and recruiters – out of the trees, so don’t interview alone

Not surprisingly, recruiters hunt for the traits that are the positive side of narcissist behaviour. These include the narcissist’s charm – they can ‘charm the birds out of the trees’ with their confidence, easy way and ability to persuade people to their way of thinking.

On the other hand, they are also self-absorbed, have vaulting ambition and have an inflated and, at times, unrealistic opinion of themselves. Their soaring ambition and sense of entitlement may also motivate them to manipulate the recruitment process.

Organisations that feature occupations which have high levels of independence in their work, such as sales, law, psychiatry, politics, finance and science, are attractive to narcissists and other personality-disordered people. So, in putting their best foot forward

and giving a good impression at interview – by being too much of a good thing, really – they can make their more undesirable traits hard to spot.

So, if you do one thing differently, in order to avoiding recruiting such individuals, then use a psychometric test specifically designed to detect the unhealthy and disordered aspects of people’s personalities.

Ideally, avoid being attractive by doing these five things:

  • The job advert – don’t use the words visionary (undesirable as this encourages power fantasies); persuasive (undesirable as can also be exploitative); influential (undesirable as it lends itself to manipulation)
  • Use a robust, structured selection process
  • Interview candidates with at least one other person present
  • Use psychometric tests designed to identify negative characteristics
  • Check out references, preferably with a phone call

 We can help with professional psychometric testing

Reach us 

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499

E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

We have experience in the use of psychometric tools for both individuals and teams. We are  ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people. Psychometric testing can add value when:

    • Individuals or teams are underperforming
    • New teams need to learn to perform fast
    • Team members are unhappy with each other

What do you think?

Recognising the narcissist in your organisation

Identifying Narcissists

Identifying Narcissists

Since I published my ‘Charming the birds off the trees’ blog post I have received a number of inquiries about how to identify whether there may be a narcissist in your organisation. I hope the thinking below helps.

A distinct aspect of narcissistic behaviour is the need for excessive admiration. The narcissist demands respect from people at all levels in an organisation – and for everything they do. This degree of praising may feel like hard work to those expected to provide it. However, always remember that ‘criticism’ is unwelcome to a narcissist.

Signs to look out for are:

  • They are often keen to change roles before their manager has a chance to notice a systematic pattern.
  • They show immature or inappropriate behaviour, including poor coping skills, gossiping (for example, based on privileged access to personnel files), inappropriate remarks (for example, asking people in a team-building game to consider sexual experiences with others).
  • Some narcissists have performance issues, such as poor results/missed objectives that they usually cover up. Narcissists often explain these poor results as being the result of someone or something else out of their control obstructing them. The sound bite may sound like this: “X did not do their job properly.”
  • Strong narcissistic performers expect others to work as they do. Where this requires co-operation from others there are often complaints about the narcissist being autocratic, micro-managing and being overly demanding of others. This often results in a high turnover of team members. One story I heard was ruefully told. She was ‘made’ to work until midnight to get a task completed, only to discover that the narcissist had taken the next day off and taken all the credit for delivery.
  • Narcissists have difficulty in taking a balanced perspective. For example, I once heard a call centre manager refuse sales training for his people, as it would “simply make my people more attractive and they will leave”.
  • Narcissists are perceived as being insensitive, often shouting in public and deliberately humiliating people. For example, on the death of a team member’s mother – “you’ll get used to it” – said in an abrasive, abusive tone. And there was the demand that an ill colleague continue to work in order to finish a task important to the narcissist.

Charming the birds off the trees

Charming the birds off the trees, or a charming devil?

Charming the birds off the trees, or a charming devil?

‘I start off as a witch, and then get a bit nicer – sometimes’

When does confidence, easy charm and the ability to persuade people to your way of thinking move towards a darker, unhealthy part of personality. More often than you may think, since research in the USA indicates that executive failure owing to personality traits costs $3m annually. Given the relative seniority of such people, these costs may be the tip of the iceberg.

Often people who are charming are successful in organisations. However, organisations are often inept at noticing those with a darkside to charm: narcissism.

Narcissists are unpleasant and destructive to work with, or for. They are self absorbed, have vaulting ambition with inflated and at times, unrealistic opinions about themselves, particularly in relation to others. Examples I have heard are “I can make a profit anywhere”, “I start off as a witch, and then get a bit nicer, sometimes”, “I have made a mistake accepting this new job, it is not big enough for me”. Even just three statements show their sense of entitlement and exemption from standards and norms. In gaining entitlement they can be vicious, deliberately sabotage careers of others, and are good at managing their managers. Significantly, they feel no remorse. Equally, they can be charismatic, dramatic and exciting.

So, if your recruitment and performance management systems can’t tell the difference between someone who can healthily ‘charm the birds off the trees’ and some who is an unhealthy ‘charming devil’ take heed! It is simply not true that devilish individuals won’t rise to important positions. There is evidence that well known and initially respected business leaders, sports people, politicians and religious leaders have been clearly diagnosed as having narcissist personality traits.