Is the salary-linked annual performance review dead?

Use perfromance management to coach your people and provide frequent, on-going feedback

Use performance management to coach your people and provide frequent, on-going feedback

When big names like Accenture, Adobe, Microsoft and GAP all announce they have stopped linking salary increases to annual performance reviews this underscores the fact that some organisations’ performance management techniques just don’t work.

Organisations are moving towards a wider distribution of leadership roles, as well as more flexible working (both location and hours). Along with this has come a flatter hierarchy and an increasing need for quick action. Given this, your leadership style and skills may need to be updated to make performance management more meaningful. How is your leadership style developing?

As a leader you need to have a positive attitude to performance management. When it is used in an ongoing fashion, and focuses on both individuals and teams, leaders can use it to create a highly motivated workplace.

This happens when you involve your people so that they use their team voice in helping identify good performance. Together you can develop appropriate, fair and relevant measurements that also align with company strategy. Performance evaluation needs to take place with an understanding of the challenges and issues that may not have been within the team or the individual’s control – essential to ensure assessments are fair.

To do this well, you may need training to improve your ability to tailor ongoing performance management. The best training for leaders balances both technical and soft skills. But such an effort is worthwhile because it will allow you to use ongoing positive performance management to motivate your people well – to support them in times of need; and to praise them for good work, and recognise extra effort – and be seen in a positive light to promote team bonds. Remember not everyone has a preference for receiving feedback so gauge the predominant feedback preference of your team members.

Is the salary-linked annual performance review dead? In large organisations the press seem to think so. More important is the desire and need for performance management to focus on people-development rather than people-payment no matter. Therefore, involve your people to help identify good performance. Collaborating together provides a chance that the performance management systems and techniques will be meaningful, motivating and align both your work and that of your people to organisational strategy.

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

T: 07779 345 499

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people.

Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Certified ACT practioner
  • Support if you are being bullied, or have a member of your organisation who has made a bullying complaint
  • Certified Mediation practioner, to address workplace conflict,
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations
  • Special projects, secondments and assignments

Photo by nenetus

Do you have brilliant team bonds and good followship in your team?

Good follow-ship helps teams to advance their effectiveness

Good followship helps teams to advance their effectiveness (1)

Conversations with Managing Directors, senior leaders  and their people often reveal that they feel good ‘followship’ helps teams – at all levels – to advance their effectiveness. Good followship, especially by team members, is an ability to: promote team bonds, take direction well, actively support the team tasks, and deliver what is required.

 

The importance of both leadership and followship – and therefore, effective teamwork – is powerfully encapsulated by Rudyard Kipling in the first stanzas of his poem ‘The Pack’:

Now this is the law of the jungle, as old and true as the sky,

And the wolf that shall keep it may prosper, but the wolf that shall break it must die.

As the creeper that girdles the tree trunk, the law runneth forward and back;

For the strength of the pack is the wolf, and the strength of the wolf is the pack.

J K Kipling

J K Kipling

Kipling neatly sums up the importance of social bonds and social cohesion to team performance. His poem underlines that repercussions from poor team social cohesion can be far reaching, fatal in fact.

Thejunglebook_movieposter

Jungle Book Poster (2)

J.R. Kipling (1865-1936) is a well known late Victorian poet and story-teller. He won the Nobel Prize for literature in 1907. All Kipling’s major work remains in print. Kipling’s writing for children is still popular perhaps best represented by ‘The Jungle Book’ (1894) and inspired the film by Walt Disney Productions in 1967(2).

 

 

 

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499

E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people.

Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Certified ACT practioner
  • Support if you are being bullied, or have a member of your organisation who has made a bullying complaint
  • Certified Mediation practioner, to address workplace conflict,
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations
  • Special projects, secondments and assignments
    1. Image courtesy of stockimages at FreeDigitalPhotos.net
  1. “Thejunglebook movieposter” by Source. Licensed under Fair use via Wikipedia – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Thejunglebook_movieposter.jpg#/media/File:Thejunglebook_movieposter

Three ways to help team members commit support to each other

Commit to helping each another will develop your team spirit.

teams who commit to helping each other lift their team performance

Teams who commit to helping each other lift their team performance

Have a team voice: involve your team in issues that affect them, give them their voice and listen to what they say. Help team colleagues to identify when and who may need help. Then support and show gratitude to each other when help is received.

Stretching team goals provide a unifying focal point

Stretching team goals provide a unifying focal point

 

 

Make the team mean something: have stretching team goals that have a purpose, are clear and also compelling in order to be a unifying focal point. Talk about your team goals when you are together. Put team goals into the limelight so they mobilise your team spirit. Goals need clear finish lines, so you all know when they have been achieved.

 

Pride (2)Celebrate the big and little wins: This can be as simple as a thank you and well done. It’s about taking a moment, all together, to enjoy and learn together about what works well for you as a team – see previous blog about appreciation.

 

Building an effective team happens through leadership and team involvement. It is supported with authentic gratitude and a shared team vision.

This is the third blog about how to help your team to be the best it can and be successful. The principles below can deepen team bonds when implemented well and greatly improve team performance.

Principles:

  • Observe confidentiality
  • Appreciate statements that each team member makes
  • Commit to helping each other
  • Give everyone a chance to speak and support each person’s contribution

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499

E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people.

Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Certified ACT practioner
  • Support if you are being bullied, or have a member of your organisation who has made a bullying complaint
  • Certified Mediation practioner, to address workplace conflict,
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations
  • Special projects, secondments and assignments

Appreciation goes a very long way indeed in team-building

Appreciation is an often neglected aspect of building effectiveness

Appreciation is an often neglected aspect of building effectiveness

In my last blog post I introduced you to the principles that promote a safe team environment:

  • Observe confidentiality
  • Appreciate statements that each team member makes
  • Commit to helping each other
  • Give everyone a chance to speak – and support each person’s contribution

I talked about principle one: confidentiality [Nhttp://mwrconsulting.co.uk/?p=9652] now I am going to look at principle two: appreciation.

Why?

It is an often neglected aspect of building effectiveness. What a shame. Appreciation conveys a recognition of both the team and its individual members. Here are three ‘appreciative’ tips to help you appreciate each other:

  1. Say ‘thank you’ to one another for doing good work; for sharing information, and for giving and receiving help. Such appreciation also builds the foundation for being appreciated in return.
  2. Agree with your team colleagues that you will validate and appreciate each other’s statements, whether or not you agree with them. This can be done by saying, “Yes, and…

Let’s take a closer look at the “Yes, and…” approach.

Jack, a member of your team, recommends to you all that a team charter that covers the social aspects of team effectiveness would help the team a lot. The first response comes from Evie, who says, Yes, and then we can use it with new team members and when people are seconded to help us.”

It works because ‘yes’ accepts and appreciates the contribution made, and this enables deeper collaboration.

And the “and…” adds to the acceptance and appreciation shown by encouraging new information to be added. Hence the expression: yes and 1Pro

  1. The team can also express appreciation and provide challenging questions that develop ideas by responding with:

yes and 1Pro …that sounds interesting…

Or, “that makes me think….” Before offering their own contribution.

These three appreciative tips work well to create a space where everyone can be heard.

Photo by Ambro

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499

E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people.

Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Certified ACT practioner
  • Support if you are being bullied, or have a member of your organisation who has made a bullying complaint
  • Certified Mediation practioner, to address workplace conflict,
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations
  • Special projects, secondments and assignments

Three ways to build a team using confidentiality and information-sharing

You can help your team to be the best it can and be successful.

Involve as many of your people as we practically can.

Build a successful team – use 4 principles to create a psychologically safe team environment

The principles below can deepen team bonds when implemented well and greatly improve team performance.

4 Principles that build a psychologically safe team environment:

  • Observe confidentiality
  • Appreciate statements that each team member makes
  • Commit to helping each other
  • Give everyone a chance to speak and support each person’s contribution
Breaches of team confidentiality breaks trust - potentially beyond repair

Breaches of team confidentiality breaks trust – potentially beyond repair

Once in place, these principles help create a safe work environment. In this blog post I am going to take a closer look at confidentiality. Why? Well it’s easy to take confidentiality for granted. But such complacency leads to gaffes and the kind of confidentiality breaches that can damage trust beyond repair. Experience shows that being clear about confidentiality helps team members realise just how important it is.

There are three steps involved in securing and building confidentiality:

  1. Clarity – be clear about what can and can’t be shared

From the outset, your team should agree to keep the content team dialogues confidential.

  1. Realism – be realistic about the sharing of learning

It makes sense to define and agree on what can be shared outside of team dialogues. A positive approach to this is to treat team dialogues as a learning opportunity. This encourages team members to use what they have learnt. In this way, the team builds the supportive conditions necessary for knowledge sharing.

It’s also important to agree on what should not be shared with those not on the team. Team members need to be clear about why certain information can’t be shared so everyone understands the implications. Specifically, information sharing shouldn’t include verbatim reports of who said what (good or bad) nor elaborate examples of conflict, or moments that may have been difficult and distressing for the team.

  1. Purpose – of confidentiality

Confidentiality, when clarified, works because valuable insights from information sharing build team knowledge. This is important since information sharing has been consistently shown to enhance team effectiveness and productivity, and, hence, performance.

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499

E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people.

Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Certified ACT practioner
  • Support if you are being bullied, or have a member of your organisation who has made a bullying complaint
  • Certified Mediation practioner, to address workplace conflict,
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations
  • Special projects, secondments and assignments

7 ways to clear team goals

Have clear team goals, goals that are clear as mud hold teams back

Have clear team goals and a positive team vibe to have both creativity and innovation, gin your team

Goals that are clear as mud hold teams back – here’s how to develop clear team goals

When a team has clear goals and enjoys a positive emotional vibe this will drive both creativity and innovation.*

But if goals are clear as mud, your team will definitely be held back from becoming the best it could.

Goal clarity builds motivation to be creative and innovative, and to take calculated risks.

Goal clarity also encourages teams to collaborate and pull together to achieve success. Even in tough times, clear goals can build certainty and help teams stay on track. They can then achieve high levels of productivity. Goal clarity and a positive emotional vibe are the foundations for high and consistent team performance.

7 ways to achieve goal clarity and flourish – and secure high team performance:

  1. Involve team members in developing, clarifying and prioritising team goals before undertaking any creative or innovative activity
  2. Build a positive emotional climate (see previous blog post [Positive Emotional Climate])
  3. Encourage team members to drive changes in their work processes
  4. Use team-building to get new team members, or new teams, established quickly with clear goals
  5. Explore and develop team values, and explore how the team will work together
  6. Provide coaching to help individual team members be flexible and develop a commitment to team goals
  7. Resolve interpersonal conflict and conflict between teams to create a positive team vibe

A positive emotional climate with clarity around team goals helps creativity and innovation become the norm and enables – and sustains – high levels of team productivity.

* Peralta, C.F. et al. (2015) Innovation processes and team effectiveness: The role of goal clarity and commitment, and team-affective tone, Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, vol 88, part 1, March

 

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499

E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people.

Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Certified ACT practioner
  • Support if you are being bullied, or have a member of your organisation who has made a bullying complaint
  • Certified Mediation practioner, to address workplace conflict,
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations
  • Special projects, secondments and assignments

Not Everyone Feels Empowered by Feedback!

Some people are not empowered by recieiving feedback

The feedback environment created by supervisors can develop employee empowerment

Supervisors need to be encouraged to move away from a ‘one-size fits all’ feedback environment, in order to support employee empowerment. A feedback environment is created by informal, daily feedback exchanges between supervisors and team members. Research1 shows that receiving feedback is not always enough to increase an employee’s perception of empowerment. The researchers found that:

  • Supervisors who created a positive feedback environment were more likely to help employees both feel comfortable to receive feedback, and also find work meaningful. Meaningful work linked organisational expectations of jobs with individual beliefs, values and employee empowerment
  • Individuals with a preference for receiving feedback found work meaningful, had a positive supervisor relationship and felt empowered.
  • Individuals who were not comfortable receiving feedback tended to be less likely to find meaning at work, had a less positive relationship with their supervisor and felt less empowered than those who were comfortable receiving feedback.
Hold conversations

Employees without a preference for receiving feedback may not feel empowered

Therefore, supervisors should be supported to gauge the predominant feedback preference among team members. Where a majority of employees prefer receiving feedback, a high feedback environment created by the supervisor would be valuable. However, where employees have a low preference for feedback, a minimal feedback environment may be advantageous.

 

1 Gabriel, Frantz, Levy and Hilliard, (2014) The Supervisor feedback environment is empowering, but not all the time: Feedback orientation as a critical moderator, Journal of Occupational and Organisational Psychology, 87, 487-506

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499

E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people.

Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Special projects, secondments and assignments
  • Mediation, to address workplace conflict
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level

Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations

Top tips about how to use Job-crafting to personalise and advance employee engagement

Involve as many of your people as we practically can.

Collaborative team job-crafting positively advances employee engagement and team performance

Compliance to best practice, and especially LEAN principles, demand tight control of work practices to secure efficiency. However, sometimes ‘best practice’ may lack specific contextual relevance. This may result in work lacking in meaning, organisations experiencing low employee engagement that adversely impacts performance.

 

However, researchers1 studying three call centres found that when supervisors support their teams to make informal adjustments to procedures and processes, known as ‘job-crafting’, this resulted in higher employee engagement and team performance. Job-crafting met team needs for control and helped make their work meaningful. Researchers also revealed that job-crafting built connections with other team members and aided collaboration between teams. So, how did job-crafting work in the 3 call centres studied?

The researchers received two surprises:

  • call centre teams – notoriously low in control – were capable of complying both with standardised LEAN approaches and job-crafting. For example, after a customer call, during ‘wrap up’ to complete actions and update records, job-crafting allowed individuals and teams to experiment and try new approaches
  • team supervisors actively supported individual and team job-crafting. They helped target and set boundaries around tasks and procedures that were available to be job-crafted.

The researchers recommended 5 things that firms should do:

1. Develop supervisor practices to foster team job-crafting

2. Encourage and support supervisors to foster team social and task cohesion

3. Create a climate that encourages experimentation and sharing of new working methods and document them

4. Provide boundaries and develop areas within which team job-crafting can take place and encourage it – talk about it- share it

5. Undertake team training to help teams to think widely about the kind of issues where job-crafting would be suitable.

Call centre supervisors and managers need to recognise the benefits from targeted team based job-crafting.

1 McClelland, G.P., Leach, D.J., Clegg, C.W., McGowan, I. (2014) Collaborative crafting in call centre teams, Journal of Occupational Psychology, 87, 464-486

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499

E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people.

Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Special projects, secondments and assignments
  • Mediation, to address workplace conflict
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations