Three ways to help team members commit support to each other

Commit to helping each another will develop your team spirit.

teams who commit to helping each other lift their team performance

Teams who commit to helping each other lift their team performance

Have a team voice: involve your team in issues that affect them, give them their voice and listen to what they say. Help team colleagues to identify when and who may need help. Then support and show gratitude to each other when help is received.

Stretching team goals provide a unifying focal point

Stretching team goals provide a unifying focal point

 

 

Make the team mean something: have stretching team goals that have a purpose, are clear and also compelling in order to be a unifying focal point. Talk about your team goals when you are together. Put team goals into the limelight so they mobilise your team spirit. Goals need clear finish lines, so you all know when they have been achieved.

 

Pride (2)Celebrate the big and little wins: This can be as simple as a thank you and well done. It’s about taking a moment, all together, to enjoy and learn together about what works well for you as a team – see previous blog about appreciation.

 

Building an effective team happens through leadership and team involvement. It is supported with authentic gratitude and a shared team vision.

This is the third blog about how to help your team to be the best it can and be successful. The principles below can deepen team bonds when implemented well and greatly improve team performance.

Principles:

  • Observe confidentiality
  • Appreciate statements that each team member makes
  • Commit to helping each other
  • Give everyone a chance to speak and support each person’s contribution

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499

E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people.

Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Certified ACT practioner
  • Support if you are being bullied, or have a member of your organisation who has made a bullying complaint
  • Certified Mediation practioner, to address workplace conflict,
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations
  • Special projects, secondments and assignments

Appreciation goes a very long way indeed in team-building

Appreciation is an often neglected aspect of building effectiveness

Appreciation is an often neglected aspect of building effectiveness

In my last blog post I introduced you to the principles that promote a safe team environment:

  • Observe confidentiality
  • Appreciate statements that each team member makes
  • Commit to helping each other
  • Give everyone a chance to speak – and support each person’s contribution

I talked about principle one: confidentiality [Nhttp://mwrconsulting.co.uk/?p=9652] now I am going to look at principle two: appreciation.

Why?

It is an often neglected aspect of building effectiveness. What a shame. Appreciation conveys a recognition of both the team and its individual members. Here are three ‘appreciative’ tips to help you appreciate each other:

  1. Say ‘thank you’ to one another for doing good work; for sharing information, and for giving and receiving help. Such appreciation also builds the foundation for being appreciated in return.
  2. Agree with your team colleagues that you will validate and appreciate each other’s statements, whether or not you agree with them. This can be done by saying, “Yes, and…

Let’s take a closer look at the “Yes, and…” approach.

Jack, a member of your team, recommends to you all that a team charter that covers the social aspects of team effectiveness would help the team a lot. The first response comes from Evie, who says, Yes, and then we can use it with new team members and when people are seconded to help us.”

It works because ‘yes’ accepts and appreciates the contribution made, and this enables deeper collaboration.

And the “and…” adds to the acceptance and appreciation shown by encouraging new information to be added. Hence the expression: yes and 1Pro

  1. The team can also express appreciation and provide challenging questions that develop ideas by responding with:

yes and 1Pro …that sounds interesting…

Or, “that makes me think….” Before offering their own contribution.

These three appreciative tips work well to create a space where everyone can be heard.

Photo by Ambro

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499

E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people.

Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Certified ACT practioner
  • Support if you are being bullied, or have a member of your organisation who has made a bullying complaint
  • Certified Mediation practioner, to address workplace conflict,
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations
  • Special projects, secondments and assignments

Three ways to build a team using confidentiality and information-sharing

You can help your team to be the best it can and be successful.

Involve as many of your people as we practically can.

Build a successful team – use 4 principles to create a psychologically safe team environment

The principles below can deepen team bonds when implemented well and greatly improve team performance.

4 Principles that build a psychologically safe team environment:

  • Observe confidentiality
  • Appreciate statements that each team member makes
  • Commit to helping each other
  • Give everyone a chance to speak and support each person’s contribution
Breaches of team confidentiality breaks trust - potentially beyond repair

Breaches of team confidentiality breaks trust – potentially beyond repair

Once in place, these principles help create a safe work environment. In this blog post I am going to take a closer look at confidentiality. Why? Well it’s easy to take confidentiality for granted. But such complacency leads to gaffes and the kind of confidentiality breaches that can damage trust beyond repair. Experience shows that being clear about confidentiality helps team members realise just how important it is.

There are three steps involved in securing and building confidentiality:

  1. Clarity – be clear about what can and can’t be shared

From the outset, your team should agree to keep the content team dialogues confidential.

  1. Realism – be realistic about the sharing of learning

It makes sense to define and agree on what can be shared outside of team dialogues. A positive approach to this is to treat team dialogues as a learning opportunity. This encourages team members to use what they have learnt. In this way, the team builds the supportive conditions necessary for knowledge sharing.

It’s also important to agree on what should not be shared with those not on the team. Team members need to be clear about why certain information can’t be shared so everyone understands the implications. Specifically, information sharing shouldn’t include verbatim reports of who said what (good or bad) nor elaborate examples of conflict, or moments that may have been difficult and distressing for the team.

  1. Purpose – of confidentiality

Confidentiality, when clarified, works because valuable insights from information sharing build team knowledge. This is important since information sharing has been consistently shown to enhance team effectiveness and productivity, and, hence, performance.

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499

E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people.

Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Certified ACT practioner
  • Support if you are being bullied, or have a member of your organisation who has made a bullying complaint
  • Certified Mediation practioner, to address workplace conflict,
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations
  • Special projects, secondments and assignments

7 ways to clear team goals

Have clear team goals, goals that are clear as mud hold teams back

Have clear team goals and a positive team vibe to have both creativity and innovation, gin your team

Goals that are clear as mud hold teams back – here’s how to develop clear team goals

When a team has clear goals and enjoys a positive emotional vibe this will drive both creativity and innovation.*

But if goals are clear as mud, your team will definitely be held back from becoming the best it could.

Goal clarity builds motivation to be creative and innovative, and to take calculated risks.

Goal clarity also encourages teams to collaborate and pull together to achieve success. Even in tough times, clear goals can build certainty and help teams stay on track. They can then achieve high levels of productivity. Goal clarity and a positive emotional vibe are the foundations for high and consistent team performance.

7 ways to achieve goal clarity and flourish – and secure high team performance:

  1. Involve team members in developing, clarifying and prioritising team goals before undertaking any creative or innovative activity
  2. Build a positive emotional climate (see previous blog post [Positive Emotional Climate])
  3. Encourage team members to drive changes in their work processes
  4. Use team-building to get new team members, or new teams, established quickly with clear goals
  5. Explore and develop team values, and explore how the team will work together
  6. Provide coaching to help individual team members be flexible and develop a commitment to team goals
  7. Resolve interpersonal conflict and conflict between teams to create a positive team vibe

A positive emotional climate with clarity around team goals helps creativity and innovation become the norm and enables – and sustains – high levels of team productivity.

* Peralta, C.F. et al. (2015) Innovation processes and team effectiveness: The role of goal clarity and commitment, and team-affective tone, Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, vol 88, part 1, March

 

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499

E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people.

Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Certified ACT practioner
  • Support if you are being bullied, or have a member of your organisation who has made a bullying complaint
  • Certified Mediation practioner, to address workplace conflict,
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations
  • Special projects, secondments and assignments

7 steps for quality group decision-making; to prevent you following like sheep

Groups who make decisions as if a mindless herd of sheep tend to make bad ones

Groups who make decisions as if a mindless herd of sheep tend to make bad ones

“I feel really awful, the group decided to follow a daft suggestion like a herd of sheep”.

Often we feel comfortable just following the herd. It stops us from making and voicing our own evaluations when we feel they may be unwelcome. In many cases, this is a conscious decision, providing us with a way to shy away from the limelight and prevent us being held responsible if anything goes wrong. However, we don’t always notice this happening…

This kind of group behaviour, referred to as ‘group-think’ 1 may lead to some terrible group decisions1. The kind of circumstances that may encourage ‘group-think’ behaviours to emerge are:

  • The group likes being together and sticks together. It is comfortable, respectful and friendly, plus;
  • There is a strong leader and the group lacks procedures to help it make decisions, such as using evidence. This means the leader may become unduly influential
  • Pressure from the environment pushes a group to make quick decisions. The value of good ideas, evidence driven thinking, challenges to how things are done and even involvement of people with expertise outside the group is diminished.
Make good group decisions, avoid 'group-think'

Make good group decisions, avoid ‘group-think’

Here are 7 tips to help:

  1. Establish ground rules and a group charter about how meetings will work
  2. Separate and have a dialogue to tease out the difference between constructive challenges and personal disagreements
  3. Take time to assess the downside and risk that may be associated with a decision
  4. Test out whether the data you have stands up to scrutiny; do you need more, or is the idea not good enough?
  5. Involve people with expertise on an issue. Be respectful of their input and challenge constructively
  6. Take a break. Reflect on discussions to see what issues have arisen for people
  7. Rotate the leadership of the group in order to balance interests and issues with good decision making approaches

Isn’t the soup noisy today? 4 Social Media manners that matter

don't slurp your soup

Take Social Media manners seriously and showing respect for your colleagues

You wouldn’t deliberately slurp soup at your desk would you? No, of course not.

You wouldn’t want the wrath of your colleagues to descend upon you for disrupting them. Also, most of us respect and consider the colleagues that we work beside and we all know that disruption of work causes conflicts and negative feelings.

Yet, when it comes to Social Media it’s amazing how often people break such understandings and subsequently disrupt others. However, by taking Social Media manners seriously and showing respect for your colleagues will allow you to go a long way in helping to develop a good working community. Here are four such manners that will help:

1. Encourage your colleagues to agree how and when you can all use personal social media at work. This helps to avoid recrimination and keeps personal social media activity within boundaries that meet both your supervisor and team colleagues expectations

2. Put your personal and organisation phone on silent in the office. Apart from happily missing out on each others calls, colleagues probably also would appreciate not sharing ring tones, bleeps and a shuddering /vibrating desk. Especially the vibrating desk, that tends to really press neighbours’ hot buttons.

3. When talking to a colleague don’t glance at your phone. It is annoying and disrespectful. However, if you need to check information related to the conversation, or if you are waiting for an urgent email then let them know. People don’t mind then. However, be warned, don’t abuse this social convention.

4. When you are in client meetings put phones into flight mode. Also, use your out of office message to manage incoming messenger expectations. In long meetings use breaks to check your email.

Trigger Happy TV and Dom Jolly’s socially unacceptable giant Nokia hit this awkward nail right on the head! You wouldn’t shout on your phone in the silent section of the library…so give your colleagues the same treatment. In short, your social media habits can be annoying. So please stop slurping your social media soup and let others work in peace.

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499 E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people. Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Special projects, secondments and assignments
  • Mediation, to address workplace conflict
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations

‘Competency framework’ – tool for performance appraisal

 

'Competency frameworks' can provide the language needed to tackle performance management

‘Competency frameworks’ can provide the language needed to tackle performance management

‘Competency frameworks’ can provide managers with both a framework and the language needed to tackle the complex task of performance management.

They can do so in three ways:

  • by defining each competency
  • by breaking down each competency into levels of performance through which people can progress
  • by providing behavioural indicators – through the use of examples – to show what both desired and derailing behaviours look like.

The table below shows how competencies at various levels – from basic to management level – are expressed. Each competency in the table has a definition, and the different levels of performance include: behaviour, knowledge, skills, abilities, attributes and attitudes.

Table to show an example of how a coaching competency may look in an insurance industry management role – a Call Centre Manager

competancy table

Often six performance levels are indicated in such tables – from zero, which is not relevant, to five, which indicates mastery. Incidentally, the requirements at level five also include those from levels one to four. The ‘coaching competency’ table above is for an insurance industry contact centre manager role. Identifying, and then defining, all the needed competencies and then putting them into such a framework means the relevant ones can be assigned to each role (typically, these will be six to eight per role). The required level of performance is also highlighted.

A competency framework such as this can provide an organisation with both a very useful tool and the language needed for good performance management. Language can be customised by leaders to ensure it is individually focused and relevant to the team, and aligned to the organisation’s goals.

Our next blog post will explain the contribution ‘competencies’ can make to developing trust, and how trust can ignite both individual and team engagement.

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499

E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people.

 

Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Special projects, secondments and assignments
  • Mediation, to address workplace conflict
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations

 

Energise your organisation using ‘competencies’

A ‘competencies’ framework can be used to manage performance and link individual performance to organisational goals.

Illustration of a Competency Framework

Illustration of a Competency Framework

Competency is critical to individual, the team and the organisation’s performance.

Competency links individual performance to organisational goals. And when competency-based performance management is carried out well it engages people. Since competency is so important – and useful – this will be the first of five blog posts that look at various aspects of developing and using ‘competencies’ that tend to be overlooked, or tend to become diluted over time.

Managing competency starts with a framework that includes all the organisation’s roles and at all levels. Typically, six to eight such ‘competencies’ relate to business and people management, and another six to eight relate to technical skills. In large organisations there may be specific frameworks that reflect job families and distinguish between team member competencies and management ones, particularly senior management competencies.

Competencies explain – and show – how important elements, knowledge, skills, abilities, attributes and attitudes, impact specifically on each role. Like an iceberg, not all of these elements are visible – see diagram below.

Not all the important elements needed to be competent are obvious

Not all the important elements needed to be competent are obvious

However, the important elements can become visible in two ways:

  1. when identified for each role, through dialogue with those with similar roles
  2. when they become visible during performance management assessment and dialogue with the individuals concerned.

The next blog post takes a look at how competencies are expressed.

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499

E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people.

Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Special projects, secondments and assignments
  • Mediation, to address workplace conflict
  • Personal development activities
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations

 

 

 

 

How to get people to behave the way you want in the workplace

You can motivate people – in other words, reward work well done

You can motivate people – in other words, reward work well done

Coaching can help people chose alternative behaviours. But for managers to make good coaches for team members they need to ‘walk the talk’.

However, they need first need to understand the value of ‘walking the talk’, and this involves open communication and follow-through, and treating others as you would like to be treated yourself.

Here’s the good, the bad and the ugly of workplace feedback – what works, and what really doesn’t:

  • You can motivate people – in other words, reward work well done
  • You can praise people. For example, if you have a lazy team member, you can require that tasks be completed in a certain time-frame and to a certain quality standard, and then provide positive feedback when the tasks are completed successfully
  • You could use negative reinforcement – constantly ask or tell a person to do something, and scold too
  • You could also punish the person. This is a firm favourite – it usually fails

To help get it right, use the table below. The ‘hot’ colours show what works best, the cool colours, featuring far too frequently used techniques, shows what really doesn’t work.

This table shows how to get people to behave the way you want in the workplace - use the 'hot' coloured behaviours

This table shows how to get people to behave the way you want in the workplace – use the ‘hot’ coloured behaviours

Reach us at 07779 345 499, m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

Marjorie Raymond

T: 07779 345 499

E: m.raymond@mwrconsulting.co.uk

We have experience in developing senior managers and their team members – both on an individual and team level – so they can develop practical approaches that encourage positive, constructive behaviour. This, in turn, leads to the development of positive beliefs and values. We are ready work with you, to help you get the best out of your people.

Here are some examples of approaches that can be used and tailored to your individual needs:

  • Mediation, to address workplace conflict
  • Individual and group coaching…Coaching – a powerful way of developing people
  • Personal development activities
  • Special projects, secondments and assignments
  • Psychometric assessment, which can identify strengths as well as derailing behaviours and also include 360 degree feedback
  • Structured module for understanding the psychological contracts in your organisation, both at an individual or team level
  • Straight Talking: …Straight Talking create change through conversations  

 

‘Straight Talking’ Make change easy

Create change through conversations

Create change through conversations

Straight Talking

Making change easy

Too often moaning and groaning is the only communication people expect – and get!

What a shame when those first meetings present the best opportunity to introduce change positively. And if this opportunity is missed it can even imperil the change programme.

This is the time to listen, and to understand, what is being said – and not being said.

This is the time to use dialogue, to help people think through the possibilities, and to help them create the necessary workable solutions.

You know this is happening when people say:

“We are ready to go. We don’t need to talk any more. We’ve sorted out what needs to happen for us to work well; we know how to make this work for us. Now we just want it to get on with it.”

 MWR Consulting’s ‘Straight Talking’ approach helps to create just such a ‘right’ environment for change. We are forward- focused – which leads to action.

We use workshops to help develop dialogue skills, so you can properly address the challenges you face. Our workshops allow you to challenge yourselves – and your organisation too – as to how ‘Straight Talking’ you really are.

Call us to today on 07779 345 499

For more information about ‘Straight Talking’ click here: Straight Talking create change through conversations